Will Artificial Intelligence Take My Job? (A Quick Assessment For Your Role)

As you all know, there's a lot of talk about how many jobs that are well on their way to be eliminated due to artificial intelligence. There's no secret that millions of jobs are going to be eliminated due to robotics entering the workplace to increase efficiency and accuracy. Advancements in technology are not necessarily a bad thing, but it's something that you should be aware of, especially if your job can be automated.

How do we analyze if your job is at risk of being outsourced or replaced by artificial intelligence? You can ask yourself a series of questions.

Can a software application or robot handle any skills of the current job that I'm working?

It is a straight forward question, can a software or a robot handle any aspect or your current job? And if so, how much? 25%, 50%, 75% of your job role entails? For example, for an accountant, a lot of those tasks can be automated through technology, so you want to ask yourself, how much of my job can be eliminated through artificial intelligence?

Of these skillset that cannot be outsourced due to artificial intelligence, how much of that will equate to a full time job or part time jobs?

Essentially after you do an inventory of all your skills, you need to be able to assess what is left over, is that enough to justify a full time or part time job? Artificial intelligence will come in and automate positions where there can be automation, however, artificial intelligence will never replace the human interaction. Soft skills like communication, critical thinking, conversations, negotiations, these are all important skills or what we refer to as soft skills and these skills cannot be replaced through automation or through a robot. Regardless of what your position is, whether you're an accountant or you're a paralegal, we do know a lot of these jobs can be automated through artificial intelligence, but it doesn't mean that you can't pick up additional skills within that job to help you remain in your position.

For example, if you're an accountant, you can pick up skills like negotiation and bargaining, these are soft skills that a robot cannot do. A robot is not going to sit in the boardroom and negotiate, right? This is something that requires human interaction. Things like when you have a upset customer, a robot can't necessarily de-escalate a situation that requires a conversation. So I really want you to take a moment to think deeply about where can I increase my soft skills within my current role. That may mean taking some leadership courses, negotiation courses, up-skilling or more.

My message is: Artificial intelligence, it's here and it's here to stay, but you do not have to be a casualty of that movement. You can decide right now to up-skill and re-skill. So do an assessment of your current position, write to me below in the comments. I wanna know what your thoughts on A.I are, so indicate your comments below, let me know if you have any questions as it pertains to what some of the things that you can do within your current role to re-skill or up-skill. And I'll be talking to you guys during my next video and blog.

- Constance Moonzwe, ITH Staffing COO

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What Colors to Wear (And Avoid) During Your Next Interview

Believe it or not, but the color of your interview attire can have an impact on how you are perceived during your interview.

Today we're going to talk about colors. What color suit or outfit you wear to your job interview? It's a really, really important question that is often overlooked. Color can dramatically affect the first five seconds on your interviewer so it's important to take some time to put some effort into it. For example, if you wear a red tie, you run the risk of being seen as overly assertive, dominant, and possibly a little bit arrogant. If you wear yellow or orange, you maybe seem off the wall, and you may not even be taken seriously. But for some professions though the rules can bend and switch depending on the the position you are interviewing for or the company culture. Red may be useful: for example, sales companies are often interested in overly confident candidates so if you're sporting a suit and you slip on on a red tie, that would be great for somebody who's interviewing for a sales position.

On the opposite end of the spectrum for example an accountancy firm, the rules change. When it comes to accounting firms or even legal firms, they're more interested in candidates that are more on the conservative side so red would not work, but instead colors like blue or gray or brown would be perfect. In this case we we need colors that indicate a sense of sensibility, hard work, conscientious type of personalities.

The award of Best dressed doesn't turn a poor candidate into a great candidate but it does make the right first impression. You need to prove to the interviewer that you can represent their company. This will help the interviewer and for you, the candidate to determine if this is the right fit for you in this organization. Wiki Jobs recommends wearing a dark suit with a blue or brown tie for jobs that are in accounting, law, and consulting. For jobs in sales or investment banking and similar lines of work, a dark suit with perhaps a red tie or red top would be best fitting.

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So, how are colors perceived in general?

Blue: So let's start with my favorite interview color, blue. Why blue? Blue shows that you are confident, reliable, honest. Wearing a strong blue is a good idea to almost any interview, it's one of those perfect colors to choose for an interview regardless of what career you're going for. Blue is an overall safe bet interview color.

Brown: Brown is also another great color but you really have to be careful with brown. Brown says that you're confident and you're resilient, but it can be a little bit boring. With this color you want to be careful and reach out for a second opinion before you wear brown, especially if your entire suit or your entire dress is brown.

Red: Remember red is assertive, it's bold, confident, but you need to be careful with red because sometimes it can come off as overbearing, over assertive, cocky, and or arrogant. Be very mindful with this color a red is a double edge sword.

Yellow and orange: Usually offbeat, however I personally do think yellows and oranges are great for careers that are creative. This would be a great color choice for the candidate looking for a position in the arts to digital marketing, yellow and orange is okay.

Black: You can never really go wrong with with a black suit at all, whether it's a pantsuit, a skirt suit, black is usually a strong interview color. However, for men, do not ever wear a black tie. Black ties are traditionally used for formal events and can send the wrong message. In conclusion; black suit's okay, black tie's no go.

Grey: Gray is very stylish, a lot of people don't use gray in interviews, I think it's great with another pop of color. Gray can be paired with a nice blue and you have a winning combination there.

Now let's talk about what not to wear. Unless if it's pastel in shades you want to avoid green.

Green: I know this will be disappointing to many because I love green, but it's not a color to wear to an interview. Believe it or not, green says that you're untrustworthy. Green sends out messages of deceit, so we definitely want to be careful with those greens.

Stripes: stripes, stripes, stripes. Too many stripes will make you seem like completely unhinged, so my stance on this is that unless if you really have a killer outfit, I would avoid stripes. It is just, it makes the interviewers nervous, it's just too much going on. Unless if the stripes are tasteful, I would definitely avoid wearing any kind of stripes to an interview.

I hope you took something away from this. Let me know what your thoughts are, do you have any good stories that you'd like to share about what you wore on an interview and what impression you felt that it gave off? If you found this information useful, please comment, let us know. If you feel somebody else could benefit from this content, please go ahead and share and like.


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5 Tips For an Efficient Job Search in 2019

Are you looking for a new role this year? Here's a few ways you can maximize your efforts.


Number one: Have different versions of your resume ready to go.

This will require you taking some time to think about what are the top five positions that you wanna go for. Make sure that you're clear on the titles and then customize each resume specific to that position. Remember, A.I. is huge right now and so there's a lot of screening of resumes for very specific key words, so make sure that the key words that are related to the job that you want to go for can be found in your resume.


Number two: Network Network Network!

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This is what a lot of candidates do not do and I see it all the time as a recruiter. Network network network. Do not rely on job boards, Indeed, Monster, Zip, & LinkedIn. No, get out there and network. Tell the people who are closest to you that you're looking fora new opportunity and ask them if they know of anybody that may be hiring. Another good way to network actually is to identify a list of maybe 50 to 100 people that you know relatively well, go to their company's website, and see if there's a job on that organizations’ website that is in alignment for what you're looking for and ask them for a referral. That is one great way to network but also don't forget to get offline and get out there. Job fairs, seminars, are out there and are perfect for you to use to network.

Number three, read the job description carefully.

This goes hand in hand with point number one where I'm talking about having different versions of your resume. That aligns with reading that job description very well because what I've noticed as a recruiter, so many candidates are applying for jobs that they're not qualified for. Even if the recruiter had a different job that you may be qualified for, the very fact that you applied for a job that you're not qualified for is more likely to upset that recruiter. Please be careful that you're reading the job descriptions carefully and that you are then customizing your resume for that specific job.

Number four: Know what you're worth!

So, how do you know what you're worth? I'm not talking about your worth in terms of your value from a holistic kind of perspective. I'm talking about the job market specifically, meaning research the compensation packages of the job that you're applying for. You can do this by going to Salary.com or paychecks.com, even Glassdoor. Get an idea of what that job demands in the marketplace today. If you're open for relocation then look at the demand and the compensation structure for that job in the market that you're looking to move to.

Number five: Prepare

Looking for a job is a full time job in of itself. It's important that you put your job hunting on a schedule and that you're working at it from a certain time, a start time and an end time and that you're being consistent. Consistent is key when it comes to finding a job. At the end of the day you want find a job that you really want and you do not want to have to settle for any job, right? The more time you spend in networking, making sure that you understand the job description, have different types of resumes, the more time you spend doing activities like this, the more likely you are not only to find an incredible job, but a job that pays you what you're worth in the marketplace and a job that you're really proud of.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Recruiting@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

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12 things on your work desk that are making you look unprofessional

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Some people would argue that a messy desk is a sign of genius — and actual geniuses like Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs would seem to be among them.

Others, like the people who actually work with and beside you, might find your mess less than endearing.

And beyond clutter, items that are varying degrees of inappropriate and downright disgusting are among the biggest workplace offenders, according to the human resources professionals we interviewed.

Here are a dozen desk “don’ts” that make you look less than professional.

1. An avalanche of dishes and Tupperware

Bringing your lunch to work is commendable. But leaving a week’s worth of crusted-over food containers and half of a mug collection in your workspace is atrocious.


“Keeping a lot of items you use for eating scattered all over your desk shows a lack of time management and a lack of respect for your coworkers and the shared office space,” said Jodi Barbarino, a director of HR and recruitment in Miami.

2. A swarm of sticky notes

In a 2017 survey conducted by the staffing firm OfficeTeam, more than half of the senior managers interviewed for it said that “having a messy or disorganized workspace” was the “most distracting or annoying” thing about employees’ work areas. And one of the easiest ways to create visual insanity is to accumulate so many sticky notes that you can barely see the surface of your desk anymore.

A better strategy: invest in a portable notebook and pen you love, so you’ll use them all the time to keep all your important reminders in one place.

3. Suggestive pictures or calendars

You wouldn’t need to decorate your cubicle with explicit images in order to be inappropriate in the eyes of your managers and colleagues. Barbarino said to second guess anything remotely sexy or suggestive.

“Even if they’re cartoon images, they can be very offensive, and if sexual in nature it could be treated as sexual harassment,” she said. Yes, that even includes pictures of yourself scantily clad, say, at the beach.

4. An open purse

This one is tricky. If your office doesn’t provide a closet or any other proper place for your purse, you might be inclined to leave it on your desk — after all, it’s better than the floor.

But Barbarino advises against keeping it there, and especially keeping it open. “It looks careless and invites fraudulent behavior,” she said. See if your company will allow you to hang a purse hook under your desk.

 
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5. Anything to elevate your monitor that wasn’t built for the task

Resting your monitor on a pile of books not only looks unprofessional, but it makes for a pretty unstable surface. Even worse are reams of printer paper or stacked boxes of business cards used as risers. “They’re an eyesore,” Barbarino said.

You’re better off just asking your office manager to place an order for a real monitor riser from Staples.

6. Political paraphernalia

In politically fraught times, you may be more passionate than ever about the people you want to vote in or out of office, and about the issues that matter to you.

But even if you don’t evangelize at work, simply keeping political pamphlets, posters, pins — basically anything promoting your affiliation — on your desk runs the risk of making you look inappropriate in the office.

7. Toys

“We had one associate who had his overhead bin filled with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle toys of various kinds,” said Tracy Tibbels, an HR manager at Werner Enterprises and disciplines panelist for the SHRM. “It was a little overwhelming for those who walked past his cube. Management’s perception of this was that he was not ready to move to the next level in his career which led to him being passed over for a promotion into a leadership role.” Tibbels said toys can make you seem immature and tarnish your professional image.

8. Scattered toiletries

Unless you’re in the business of product testing, items like deodorant, makeup, and toothbrushes have no place on your desk and can even be unsanitary, according to Barbarino.

“While your appearance is important, it shouldn’t be the main focus. Toiletries laying out give the impression you care more about your looks than your job,” she said. If you need to have this stuff on hand for after-work outings, keep a bag of grooming supplies in your desk drawer.

9. A pack of cigarettes

Some of your colleagues might find the very act of taking a cigarette break to be unprofessional, so that pack of Camels on your desk isn’t doing you any favors. But the smell of cigarettes — even unlit ones — could also create an issue for your office mates.

10. Solo cups

Big, red plastic cups are for beer pong, not boardrooms. “Solo cups look immature, especially for recent graduates,” Barbarino said. “Since they’re associated with alcohol, employees will wonder if you’re drinking at your desk or if the cup was left over from an office party. Both make you look sloppy.”

11. Seasonal decor that remains up all year round

Okay, so you love Halloween. But gourds and ghouls are only appropriate in the fall, according to Nicole Belyna, a recruitment manager at Thompson Creek Window Company and talent acquisition panelist for the SHRM. Keeping decor up after it’s relevant will make you look overzealous at best and lazy or neglectful at worst. Be festive, not forgetful.

12. Outrageous oddities

“The weirdest thing I’ve ever seen on anyone’s desk was a faux lion’s rug with a severed ear ornament sitting in the mouth,” said Mark Marsen, a director of HR at Allies for Health + Wellbeing and disciplines panelist for SHRM — and he admits that bizarre rug is in his own office. “Our definition of professional is unique,” he said.

The lesson? Every work environment is different. Know yours.

This article first appeared on Business Insider.




5 ways to bounce back if you’re fired

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The sudden notice of your last day at your job can be tough, no matter how many inspiration stories you hear.

You are not alone, the past has shown that even trailblazers have been fired from their positions before finding success in their chosen field.

Steve Jobs was just 30 years old, wildly successful, fabulously wealthy and a global celebrity. And then it all came crashing down when he was forced out of his own billion-dollar company he had sacrificed everything to build. Anna Wintour was fired from her first job as a junior fashion editor at Harper's Bazaar. She made waves for her innovative shoots, but editor Tony Mazalla thought they were a little too edgy and she got canned after a mere nine months.  Walt Disney had a similar story, being fired from the Kansas City star for “lack of imagination and no good ideas.”

We hear these inspirational stories, and so many more like them, and we hope the best is likely yet to come. But the reality is, finding out you are being forced out of your job is difficult to swallow.


How to Process Losing Your Job

Hearing the words, “You’re fired,” or “We have to let you go,” can be devastating.

It’s not easy, but as you walk down the hallway with a cardboard box containing your never-used stapler and mug full of pens you’re entitled to, keep your chin literally and figuratively high.

It’s natural to feel a sense of loss, lack of control, anger, fear, and devastation. Take the time and space to process these complicated emotions so that they don’t come back to haunt you. Feel sorry for yourself; let it out. Your routine has been interrupted, your relationship with former colleagues changed. It’s a lot to take in, give yourself a break.

But, once you’ve taken time to process your emotions, focus on what you are going to do next and how you are going to find your next job. Continuing to sulk, remain angry, or dwell on the unfortunate situation won’t help you change what has happened.


Ways to Bounce Back When You Get Fired

Here are a few ways you can move forward and get your career back on track:


1. Try to figure out what went wrong

It’s likely you weren’t made privy to the precise reasons your employment was terminated, but try to evaluate and understand as much as you can.

Think about the performance discussions you had while in your role — what were your shortcomings? What were you praised for doing well? How can you improve? If you have trustworthy former colleagues, ask them for their input.

Now’s the time to gather as much candid feedback as possible to improve your performance moving forward.


2. Think about what you want your next move to be

You’ll likely be in a hurry to secure another job and get back to a normal routine, but you shouldn’t blindly commit to your next position. It’s important you first consider everything you want and need out of your career.

Perhaps the path you were on wasn’t the right one; it’s OK to use this detour to take a different direction.


3. Make a plan of action

Once you’ve decided what you want your next move to be, it’s time to get back in the job search.

Before getting in touch with anyone or sending anything their way, make sure your resume, social media profiles, and other personal branding pieces — your portfolio website, for example — are up-to-date.

Start by letting people in your network know you’re looking for a new job, and work on broadening that network. Ask your connections to put you in touch with anyone that can help, go to networking events, or join alumni associations.


4. Create a list of references

Before you start applying for any new positions, contact your former managers and colleagues and ask if they would be willing to talk with potential employers about some of what you accomplished while working with them. Depending on the circumstances, you can reach out to the employer you were forced to leave.

What’s most important is that you choose references who can vouch for your positive performance.


5. Spend your time outside of the office wisely

It might take a little while for you to fully be back in the driver’s seat, so make sure you spend that gap period wisely.

Freelancing, volunteering, continuing education, new certifications, or taking time to build your skills show a potential new employer you didn’t let this time go to waste.


Help is available if you need to talk through the job loss

Getting fired isn’t easy. Even if you were struggling in the position or not satisfied, losing your job can feel like a personal failure. After all, so much of your identity is tied to what you do for a living.

If you feel a storm of emotions after being involuntarily forced out of your job, consider talking to a therapist. A licensed professional can assist in processing the loss and help you approach your job search in a healthy way: working through issues you might have had at your last job and ensuring those issues don’t arise in the future.

This article was originally published on Talkspace.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

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Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

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30 Days Down at Your New Job, What Now?

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After the exciting initial days on the job, it’s time to settle into your role. The goal in this first month is to learn how you can apply your skill set to the challenges and opportunities facing this organization.

In the first month you should:

1. Get to know your team better. It’s important to continue making new connections and allowing others to know you, too. By simply being around your new team and attentively observing how everyone works and collaborates, you’ll gain valuable insights about the company and group culture.

2. Get organized and set good habits. This job is a fresh start and a good opportunity to shed old routines. Take these first weeks to decide how you want to organize your calendar and to-do lists, how you’ll manage your time and the skills or practices you want to develop.

3. Define success with your manager. During the first few weeks, you and your manager should take time to clarify your mutual expectations. This includes understanding how you will work together, how you will get the resources you need to do your job well, and how your job performance will be assessed.

Here are a few guidelines for these conversations:

  • Come prepared and use time effectively. When you are seeking guidance or information, you should take on the work of driving that conversation.

  • Put yourself in your manager’s position. If you find that your expectations don’t align, try to see it from their perspective and find areas of overlap or compromise.

  • Identify early wins. There are probably a lot of things on your plate. As you learn more about what your manager values, prioritize the tasks that support their goals as well.

Bonus first month tip: Be humble and open-minded

When we are humble, we are acknowledging that we cannot go it alone. Take the time to thank the people who are showing you the ropes, don’t take credit for work you haven’t done and listen more than you speak. You’ve never done this exact job in this exact setting, so no matter how much experience you have behind you, keep an open mind.

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WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

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10 Career Tips I'd Tell Younger Me

Hindsight is 20/20 so let’s look back and see what we’ve learned from our experience in the field.

When you’re a newbie in the first early years of your field or beginning your job hunt, there is not much to go off of to avoid pitfalls and easy mistakes. You just don’t have a storage of experience and mistakes where you can look back and figure out your next move. The one thing you have is your gut to go one and a little bit of luck.

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Let outline some real life usable career tips that anyone who’s been able to successfully move up in their field would want to tell their younger newbie selves and people who are just beginning.


1. Results are the bottom Line

Sometimes as an hourly employee we get wrapped up in our time and effort and how long it takes to complete a project or task at hand, which can also determine the quality of our work. But, this is a two edge sword, we must aim for the best desired outcome, without overspending too much time where spending more time does not equal significantly better results.

Enough effort can cause some great results. Your goal should be to use your time and energy wisely and to focus on the results.


2. Find your dream job

To land a dream job is is a career goal. Dream jobs don’t fall out of the sky no matter how qualified or well connected you are. It takes a lot of reflecting, successful work streaks, and a pinch of luck. Therefore, it is key to dig deep and figure out what you excel at and what you might need to improve on in order to make your way to your dream position.

Keep in mind that dream jobs come with finding a dream company with a company culture that meshes well with your personality and values. Once you find the right positions you must find the right company to let your talents shine.


3. Your decisions are more powerful than you think…

The truth is your decision are very powerful and can be life changing if you want them to be, do not underestimate your power of change. At some point in time you did decide to go into this career, job, or company but that doesn’t mean you have to stay stuck in commitment forever.

Don’t be afraid to venture into a career change. The Main Point: Be open to new possibilities and be flexible you can be happy learning new skills and finding a new position that fits your long term goals as you grow older and your direction in life changes.


4. Remember, it’s just a job …

… not your entire world. Self-employed business owners, and workaholics may see this different but if you are giving your job your all, your 100% everyday at every project and task, at the end of the day… your job does not define you.

A healthy balance is the take away here. Yes you should have pride in what you do and respect your position but in order to have a healthy mind and body, you do need to clock-out and have a life outside your job.


5. Keep it moving

What isn’t growing is dead. The same rule applies to your career if you stay in the same position for too long — you must learn and grow with new skills and environments. Competition is fierce with companies now cross-training their force in difference fields and skills, you must always be acquiring new skills. Do not stop and do not get comfortable, take the new opportunities to get to the next level. Standing still will leave you behind.


6. Dare to address topics with anyone and everyone

Communicating your needs and what matters to you in important in maintaining a happy work environment. Having a real conversation who ever it may be to address an issue to resolve is the way to get things changed.

The key take away is to communicate and tailor your message to who you are addressing, take your time to get your message across, listen to what the other party has to say, and make sure you are in a calm and composted and in the right state of mind.


7. Learn to stay calm

Situations may arise at work where you work that may make you angry, sad, disappointed, frustrated, or any range of emotions. These testing times and situations are important to remember to stay level headed to take a clear well thought action to move past it.

Having a strong hold and restraint on your emotions when things hit the fan will command respect from your co workers and supervisors and help you come out the other side with a positive outcome.


8. Manage your finances NOW

Part of being an adult is being able to manage your finances. Having a plan for the future with your finances can be a relief for you down the line. Take advantage of any benefits your company may offer like matching your 401k, setting aside a savings account that you do not touch and regularly contribute to, give yourself financial goals and smash through your milestones. There are many things you can do by thinking ahead financially, these are a few to start.


9. Tune out the people who say you can’t do it … and just do it

This sentence can stand alone. Do not let others get in the way of your goals or diminish your accomplishments. Sometimes the words of others can be made with good intentions but the point is to trust yourself and your grit.


10. Work should be enjoyable

Although work cannot be 100% rainbows and butterflies even at your dream job you should be able to have some happiness and joy in your day to day. If you have a case of the Mondays every Monday and Friday can’t come fast enough then it’s time to find a new place to work.



WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

Follow us on your favorite social platform

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21 Curveball Interview Questions (And How To Knock Them Out The Park)

Curveball questions are always up an interviewers sleeve. Hiring managers ask these questions to poke around to learn more about you, even information you don’t really want to give up.

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With a few well picked questions the interviewer can pick up a lot of information.

As simple as they seem on the surface, these questions are crafted to dig into more information. Especially information you may be wanting to conceal. AKA Trick Questions.

“To uncover areas that may reflect inconsistencies, hiring managers sometimes ask these tricky questions,” said Tina Nicolai, executive career coach and founder of Resume Writers’ Ink.

But they’re not just about exposing your flaws, said Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant.

“Their real agenda is for your answers to ultimately paint a picture that you are the perfect fit for the job — not just on paper, but from an overall trust standpoint,” Taylor said.

Lets get down the trick questions!

1. How would you describe yourself in one word?

Why do they ask this? Through that one word, Taylor said employers will be able to assess your personality type, how confident you are in your self-perception, and whether your work style is a good fit for the job.

What makes it tricky? This question can be a challenge, particularly early on in the interview, because you don’t really know what personality type the manager is seeking. “There is a fine line between sounding self-congratulatory versus confident, and humble versus timid,” Taylor said. “And people are multifaceted, so putting a short label on oneself can seem nearly impossible.”

What response are they looking for? Proceed cautiously. “If you know you’re reliable and dedicated, but love the fact that your friends praise your clever humor, stick with the conservative route,” Taylor said.

If you’re applying for an accounting job, the one-word descriptor should not be “creative,” and if it’s an art director position, you don’t want it to be, “punctual,” for example.

“Most employers today are seeking team players that are levelheaded under pressure, upbeat, honest, reliable, and dedicated,” Taylor said.

2. How does this position compare to others you are applying for?

Why do they ask this? They’re basically asking: “Are you applying for other jobs?” And they want to see how you speak about other companies or positions that hold your interest — and how honest you are.

What makes it tricky? If you respond, “This is the only job I’m applying for,” your interviewer will worry. Very few job applicants apply to only one job, so they may assume you’re being dishonest. But if you’re too effusive about your other prospects, however, the hiring manager may see you as unattainable and pass. “Speaking negatively about other jobs or employers isn’t good either,” Nicolai added.

What response are they looking for? Go with this response, Nicolai said: “There are several organizations with whom I am interviewing, however, I’ve not yet decided the best fit for my next career move.”

“This is positive and protects the competitors,” Nicolai said. “No reason to pit companies or to brag.”

3. Can you name three of your strengths and weaknesses?

Why do they ask this? The interviewer is looking for red flags and deal-breakers, such as an inability to work well with coworkers or an inability to meet deadlines.

“Each job has its unique requirements, so your answers should showcase applicable strengths, and your weaknesses should have a silver lining,” Taylor said. “At the very least, you should indicate that negative attributes have diminished because of positive actions you’ve taken.”


What makes it tricky? You can sabotage yourself addressing either. Exposing your weaknesses can hurt you if you don’t explain how you’re taking steps to address them, Taylor said. “Your strengths may not align with the skill set or work style required for the job. It’s best to prepare for this question in advance, or risk landing in a minefield.”

What response are they looking for? First of all, do not say your weakness is that you “work too hard.” Interviewers are “looking for your ability to self-assess with maturity and confidence,” Taylor said.

Furthermore, hiring managers want to know that your strengths will be a direct asset to the new position, and that none of your weaknesses would hurt your ability to perform.

4. Why do you want to work here?

Why do they ask this? Interviewers ask this because they want to know what drives you the most, how well you’ve researched them as an organization, and how much you want the job.

What makes it tricky? “Clearly you want to work for the firm for several reasons,” Taylor said. “But just how you prioritize them reveals a lot about what is important to you.”

You may be thinking to yourself, “I’m not getting paid what I’m worth,” or, “I have a terrible boss,” or, “All things being equal, this commute is incredibly short” — none of which endears you to the hiring manager.

What response are they looking for? Hiring managers want to see that you’ve taken the time to research the company and understand the industry.

5. Why do you want to leave your current job?

Why do they ask this? “Your prospective boss is looking for patterns or anything negative, especially if your positions are many and short-term,” Taylor said. The interviewer may try to determine whether you have had issues working with others leading to termination, if you get bored quickly in a job, or other red flags.

What makes it tricky? If not answered diplomatically, your answer could raise further questions and doubts or sink your chances entirely.

What response are they looking for? They hope you are seeking a more challenging position that is a better fit for your skill set or that there’s something specific about their company that you’re drawn to, Taylor said.

6. What are you most proud of in your career?

Why do they ask this? Interviewers want to understand what you’re passionate about, what you feel you excel at, and whether you take pride in your work.

“How you describe your favorite project, for example, is almost as important as the project itself,” Taylor said. “It’s assumed that if you can speak with conviction and pride about your past work, you can do the same during important presentations at the new employer.”

What makes it tricky? Managers may assume that this type of work is what you really want to do most or focus on in the future. It can make you sound one-dimensional if you don’t put it in the context of a larger range of skills and interests.

What response are they looking for? Hiring managers want to see your ability to articulate well and foster enthusiasm in others, as well as your positive energy.

7. Have you ever considered being an entrepreneur?

Why do they ask this? The interviewer is testing to see if you still have the hidden desire to run your own company, thus abandoning ship, Taylor said. “No firm wants to sense this, as they will begin to ponder whether their valuable training time and money could vanish.”

What makes it tricky? Most everyone has considered being an entrepreneur at some point in their lives, but to varying degrees. This question is tricky because you can unwittingly be lured into talking about your one-time desire to be your own boss with too much perceived enthusiasm. An employer may fear that you still hope to eventually go out on your own and consider you a flight risk.

On the other hand, saying “no” outright might indicate you’re not a self-starter.

What response are they looking for? It’s OK to tell a prospective manager that you once considered entrepreneurship or have worked as an independent contractor, Taylor said. It can easily be turned into a positive by saying that you’ve already experienced it or thought about it, and it’s not for you. And that might be more convincing than saying, “No, I’ve never considered that.”

This is an opportunity to discuss why working in a corporate environment as part of a team is most fulfilling to you. You may also enjoy the specialized work in your field more than the operational, financial, or administrative aspects of entrepreneurship.

8. Have you ever stolen a pen from work?

Why do they ask this? James Reed, author of “Why You?: 101 Interview Questions You’ll Never Fear Again,” wrote in his book that hiring managers who ask this are not worried about their inventory — they’re just trying to get a better sense of your level of integrity.

What makes it tricky? We’ve all taken a pen or two, so if you say that you haven’t, then they might think you’re a liar. But if you say that you do it all the time and act like it’s no big deal, then that could be problematic, too.

Reed, who is also the chairman of Reed, a top job site in the UK and Europe, wrote in his book that saying something like “I have once or twice taken a pen from the office in an emergency but I have always returned it the next day or the day after” is a terrible response. Why? The interviewer knows that pen is still on your desk at home and might challenge you.

What response are they looking for? In his book, Reed wrote that going with something more realistic, like: “Well, I’d be lying to say I haven’t ever absentmindedly slipped a ballpoint into my jacket pocket, but it usually ends up back on my desk the following day, unless I leave it at home. I haven’t got a spare room full of paperclips and staplers, though, if that’s what you mean.”


9. What kind of boss and coworkers have you had the most and least success with, and why?

Why do they ask this? Interviewers are trying to ascertain if you generally have conflicts with people and/or personality types, Taylor said.

What makes it tricky? You run the risk of appearing difficult by admitting to unsuccessful interactions with others, unless you keep emotions out of it. You may also inadvertently describe some of the attributes of your prospective boss. If you said, “I had a boss who held so many meetings that it was hard to get my work done,” and your interviewer turns beet red — you might have hit a nerve.

What response are they looking for? “They want to hear more good than bad news,” Taylor said. “It’s always best to start out with the positive and downplay the negatives.”

You don’t want to be evasive, but this is not the time to outline all your personality shortcomings either. This is an opportunity to speak generally about traits that you admire in others yet appear flexible enough to work with a variety of personality types.

Taylor recommended you say: “I think I work well with a wide gamut of personalities. Some of my most successful relationships have been where both people communicated very well and set mutual expectations up front.”

10. If you could work for any company, where would you work?

Why do they ask this? Hiring managers want to ascertain how serious you are about working for them in particular, versus the competition, as well as your level of loyalty, Taylor said.

What makes it tricky? You might get caught up in the casual flow of the discussion and inadvertently leak out some well-respected firms, but this is counterproductive and only instills some doubt about your objectives.

What response are they looking for? “Your interviewer wants to know that you’re interviewing at your first company of choice,” Taylor said.

Try this response: “Actually, I’ve been heavily researching target firms, and (your company] seems like the ideal fit for my credentials. It’s exciting to me that (your company] is doing XYZ in the industry, for example, and I’d like to contribute my part.”

11. How do you define success?

Why do they ask this? Interviewers want insight into your priorities: are you motivated by big paychecks? Being challenged? Learning new skills? “Or,” Taylor added, “do you take a more personal, individualistic approach to success?”

What makes it tricky? This one is a minefield, since “success” is highly subjective, and even a perfectly reasonable response can be easily misinterpreted, Taylor said. “There’s a fine line between sounding ambitious and appearing as if you’re eyeing the top spot in the office — because you ‘really want to advance and make a difference.'”

What response are they looking for? When questions are broad and leave a lot of room for “a virtual inquisition,” Taylor advises keeping your answers relatively unobjectionable. “Try to define success in a way that relates to the prospective employer, based on what you know from the job description and conversation,” she said. A good response? “Applying my brand expertise to the strategic marketing goals you’ve established for XYZ company, building on your existing success.”

13. What career regrets do you have?

Why do they ask this? Reed wrote that the interviewer is really asking, “Is there something bad about you that I cannot see, and if there is, can I get you to admit it? Do you carry psychological baggage that you don’t need? How readily do you forgive yourself — and others?”

What makes it tricky? “Regret is a loaded word: don’t point it your way,” Reed wrote.

What response are they looking for? Reed suggested giving the interviewer “a little bit of grit,” but says you should try to avoid using the word “regret.”

Instead, “focus on something positive and say you wished you’d done more of it. Then stop talking.”

Here’s an edited version of the sample answer Reed offered in his book:

“All told, I don’t have too many complaints about the way things have gone. If I could change one thing, I’d have moved into the cell phone insurance business sooner than I did. I turned out to be good at that, and I enjoy it too. … If I’d moved into it sooner then maybe I’d have been sitting here a couple of years earlier — but who knows? Missing out on that taught me to take the odd risk in life, and I’m thankful for that.”

14. Why were you laid off?

Why do they ask this? “Employers want to know how you hold up under pressure and less fortunate circumstances such as job loss,” Nicolai says. “They want to hear that you are positive and ready to get back to work with a great attitude. They also want to hear a level of confidence — not defeat or anger.”

What makes it tricky? For starters, you may be bitter or angry about the layoff, and this question may prompt you to bad-mouth your former employer, which you never want to do in a job interview.

“Stay away from finger pointing, desperation, or portraying a victim,” she adds.

What response are they looking for? “Provide a level-headed answer that is focused on a business decision by the company to conduct the layoff,” Nicolai says. “Be sure to not cast blame or any discontent. Stay on track with the facts as you know them.”

15. What would you do if you won $5 million tomorrow?

Why do they ask this? They want to know whether you would still work if you did not need the money. Your response to this question tells the employer about your motivation and work ethic. The interviewer may also want to know what you would spend the money on or whether you would invest it. This illustrates how responsible you are with your money and how mature you are as a person.

What makes it tricky? Questions that are out of left field can ambush you, causing you to lose composure. “They have nothing to do with the job at hand, and you may wonder if there is any significance to them,” Taylor said. “Whether there is or not, the fact remains that you can easily lose your cool if you don’t pause and gather your thoughts before you respond to a question like this.”

What response are they looking for? They want to hear that you would continue working because you’re passionate about what you do — and they want to know you would make smart financial decisions. If you would do something irresponsible with your own money, they’ll worry you’ll be careless with theirs.

16. Have you ever been asked to compromise your integrity by your supervisor or colleague?

Why do they ask this? Your prospective boss is evaluating your moral compass by asking how you handled a delicate situation that put your integrity to the test, Taylor said. “They may also dig too deeply to test your level of discretion.” Essentially they want to know: Did you use diplomacy? Did you publicly blow the whistle? Did a backlash ensue? What was your thought process?

What makes it tricky? Interviewers want to know how you manage sensitive matters and are also wary of those who bad-mouth former employers, no matter how serious the misdeed. “They will be concerned if you share too much proprietary information with the interviewer,” Taylor said. “So it is tricky because you must carefully choose your words, using the utmost diplomacy.”

What response are they looking for? It’s wise to be clear, concise, and professional in your answer, without revealing any internal practices of prior employers. “You have nothing to gain by divulging private corporation information.”

Something like this might work: “There was one time where a fellow worker asked me to get involved in a project that seemed unethical, but the problem resolved itself. I try to be as honest as possible early on if a project creates concern for me about the company, as I’m very dedicated to its success.”

17. Can you give us a reason someone may not like working with you?

Why do they ask this? Prospective bosses want to know if there are any glaring personality issues, and what better way than to go directly to the source? “They figure that the worst that can happen is you will lie, and they may feel they’re still adept at detecting mistruths,” Taylor said. “The negative tone of the question is bound to test the mettle of even the most seasoned business professionals.”

What makes it tricky? You can easily shoot yourself in the foot with this question. If you flip and say, “I can’t think of a reason anyone wouldn’t like working with me,” you’re subtly insulting the interviewer by trivializing the question.

So you have to frame the question in a way that gets at the intent without being too hard on yourself. “Hiring managers are not seeking job candidates who have self-pity,” she said.

What response are they looking for? You don’t want to say, “Well I’m not always the easiest person to be around, particularly when under deadlines. I sometimes lose my temper too easily.” You might as well pack up and look for the nearest exit.

Taylor suggested this response: “Generally I’ve been fortunate to have great relationships at all my jobs. The only times I have been disliked — and it was temporary — was when I needed to challenge my staff to perform better. Sometimes I feel we must make unpopular decisions that are for the larger good of the company.”

18. Why have you been out of work for so long?

Why do they ask this? “Interviewers are skeptical by design,” Taylor said. “Sometimes you’re guilty until proven innocent — until all the perceived skeletons in the closet have been removed.” This is a daunting question in particular because it can seem offensive.

The implication is that you might not be motivated enough to secure a job; you are being distracted by other pursuits; your skills set may not be up to date; there is an issue with your past employers, or a host of other concerns.

What makes it tricky? The way it’s worded is naturally designed to test your resilience. The key is not to take the bait and just answer the intent of the question in a calm, factual manner.

What response are they looking for? The hiring manager wants to be assured that you possess initiative even when unemployed, as this drive and tenacity will translate well in a corporate setting.

Sample responses: “I have been interviewing steadily, but want to find the ideal fit before I jump in and give my typical 110%,” or, “I’m active in my job search, and I keep my skills current through [courses, volunteering, social media, business networking groups].”

“If you took off time to take care of a personal matter, you can certainly state that without giving a lot of detail,” Taylor said.

Make sure you’re accountable. Don’t blame the unemployment rate, your market, industry, or anything else. This is about how active and excited you are to be making a contribution to the employer.

19. Tell me about a time you disagreed with a company policy.

Why do they ask this? To determine your decision-making ability, ease of working with others, and most importantly, whether the candidate will speak up after identifying an area in need of improvement.

What makes it tricky? “To say, ‘I’ve never disagreed with a company policy’ is tough to believe from even the most amenable employee,” Nicolai said. “This also sends a message that you may just accept anything that you are told to do without thinking through all possible outcomes.”

Companies want leaders and employees to follow the rules, but they also want people who are going to review potential outdated policies and have the courage to push back and propose changes to maintain a current, competitive edge and productive workplace.

What response are they looking for? Talk about a time when you opposed a policy for a logical and business reason.

“Focus on how your idea to rework the policy was beneficial to the company as a whole. Speak up on the research that you conducted, the facts that you presented, and the outcome of your attempts to have the policy rewritten,” Taylor said.

20. How did you make time for this interview? Where does your boss think you are right now?

Why do they ask this? Hiring managers want to find out if your priorities are in the right place: current job first, interviews second.

“They know that the habits you follow now speak to your integrity and how you will treat your job at their company should you undertake a future job search,” Taylor said. “They also want to know how you handle awkward situations where you cannot be truthful to your boss. Ideally, your interview is during a break that is your time, which is important to point out.”

What makes it tricky? The implication is that you’re breaking a company rule. For most employed job seekers, it’s uncomfortable to lie about their whereabouts. So they’re vague and treat it like any other personal matter they handle on their time.

What response are they looking for? It’s wise to explain that you always put your job first, and schedule interviews before or after work, at lunchtime, during weekends if appropriate, and during personal time off.

Try something like: “My boss understands that I have certain break periods and personal time — he doesn’t ask for details. He’s most interested in my results.”

21. What’s a difficult situation that you turned around?

What do they ask this? This gives hiring managers a lot of information in one fell swoop, Taylor said. They want to know “not only know how you handle stressful situations, but also how you think through problems, how you define ‘difficult,’ and what courses of action you take when faced with any form of adversity.”

What makes it tricky? It’s easy to interpret this as an invitation to brag about the success of your turnaround. Don’t fall for it. “The emphasis is really on how you generally problem-solve under pressure,” Taylor said. “Do you illustrate any signs of stress as you describe the event? Were you creative, resourceful and prompt in its resolution? Did you follow a logical path in doing so?” Choose your examples extremely carefully, since they’ll give employers a glimpse at what you consider to be “difficult.”

What response are they looking for? Interviewers want to see that you’re a good problem solver, Taylor said. “They place a premium on those who can think clearly, remain professional when under the gun — and those who can recover quickly from setbacks.”

To ace the question, be sure you go into the meeting by preparing with a few examples of times you successfully overcame significant professional challenges.

This article was first posted on Business Insider


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

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Interview Question 101: “What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?"

What is your greatest strength.jpg

The cliché question arises in almost every interview:

Describe your personal strengths and weaknesses.

The question in straight forward but seems like a trick question but if you establish an appropriate context, then you can give an honest and well thought answer. Answering this way will showcase your professionalism & awareness. A hiring manager or recruiter ask these types of questions to qualify or disqualify you as the type of person who would excel in this specific position.

Even if you are not directly asked this question it is still a great way to prepare and frame your interview about what you can bring to the table. When you are prepared for these questions, it sets you up to answer almost any popular interview question.

What is considered a strength or weakness is different for almost every position. What is a weakness in one role can be considered a strength in a different role. There are a general scope of strengths and weaknesses that should be mentions during the interview.

Examples of General Strengths: Analytical, communication, leadership skills, team player

Examples of General Weaknesses: Hard & soft skills, and examples on how to spin your weaknesses so they don’t knock out out of the running for the role.


“What Are Your Greatest WEAKNESSES?”

The focus is on the job description so all your answers whether a strength or a weakness should be tailored to the position you are interviewing for. For example, if this role requires a lot of team projects and tasks, you would want to tailor in the fact that you are a crystal clear communicator who excels in managing and or working under a spectrum of people for a common goal.

When on the topic about weaknesses make sure to avoid any weakness that would automatically disqualify you for the position. For example, if the job requires a lot of designing and writing, do not say your weakness is creativity. No matter what weakness you mention, make sure you have a positive spin on your answer.

As an example you might want to bring up your weakness and explain it as a strength:


Example: I can be very critical of my work. Often after a project I have always felt I could have done more even thought I can look back and say I’ve done well. This pattern has left me burnt out and negative. I have decided in the past two years to make mental notes of my achievements and do little things to celebrate them. This has helped shift my thinking and to appreciate my team and other who support me”

It is only natural to have weaknesses and we rarely want to put them out there on display to someone we’ve just met, but a truthful answer can help show your fit within the organization.

Some examples of weaknesses include:

  • Unorganized

  • Critical / Sensitive

  • Perfectionism (Note: this can be a strength in many roles, make sure to give an example how perfectionism has posed a problem for you)

  • Shy / Not adept at public speaking

  • Competitive (Note: Similarly to perfectionism, this can be a strength)

  • Limited experience in a non-essential skill (especially if obvious on your resume, face this one head on)

  • Not skilled at delegating tasks

  • Take on too much responsibility

  • Not detail-oriented / Too detail-oriented

  • Not comfortable taking risks

  • Too focused / Lack of focus


Examples of Strengths

If you aren’t sure about your strengths, ask coworkers, your past managers, and friends what they see as your strongest qualities.

Some examples of strengths include:

  • Creative

  • Patient

  • Empathetic

  • Determined

  • Flexible / Versatile

  • Honest

  • Enthusiastic / Passionate / Driven

  • Collaborative

  • Disciplined / Focused

  • Committed / Dedicated

  • Respectful

  • Innovative

  • Attentive / Detail-oriented

  • Action-oriented/entrepreneurial

Some final points to keep in mind when these questions come up:

  • Remember to tailor your answer to the job description

  • Not be overly humble, and

  • Be specific in your responses. (specific situation where you were weak or strong)

When prepared, your answer this this question can really get a clear picture of who you are and how you would fit into the role. Turn your weaknesses into challenges you’re on your way to conquer and your strengths into the reasons why you should be placed perfectly into your new role.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

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8 Secrets Recruiters Won’t Tell You (But REALLY REALLY Want To)

recruiters.jpeg

Working with a recruiter may seem intimidating but recruiters truly want the best for both the candidates and the company they are recruiting for. Their goal is set up a great pairing that is set for success through the application, interview process, all the way to your first day and beyond. Even though a recruiter is doing their best for you, there are some things that recruiters can’t share.

Salary caps, candidate competition, internal HR tactics — let’s call them trade secrets. They are the confidential information that, unfortunately, recruiters cannot hand out.

Omer Molad, CEO/Founder of Vervoe, gives a few secrets out.

1. “We could have gone higher if you had negotiated.”

Salary negotiations “are like a game of poker — both job seekers and recruiters are trying to maintain control and win the hand.”

Recruiters will not tell you exactly what the company values you for, you have to know your own value. Each role has a salary range a recruiter can work with but their initial offering is rarely at the top of this range, so you must view their first offer as a starting point. - Benefits like vacation, work hours, etc. can usually be negotiated.


2. “Don’t go overboard with buzzwords — we can tell.”

It’s key to include keywords in your resume and to showcase your knowledgeable about your particular industry. However, “don’t try to look smarter than you really are,” says Molad. People forget that recruiters also want your personality to shine through to make sure it meshes well with the positions and the company culture. Tossing out big words and phrases can just get in the way and backfire.

“It’s not about specific questions or answers that stand out, but rather the candidates who display a great deal of passion about what they do that really stand above the rest,” says employer Academy Sports + Outdoors.

3. “You never had a chance after that bad first impression.”

You get one chance at a first impression and this goes especially true in your career. According to Molad, few recruiters can get past a bad first impression. Unreturned calls and emails, bad manners, tardiness to interviews, and interview slip ups will damage your chances of landing that position. Rarely will a recruiter let you know “We just don’t like you.”

“Interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not they’re actually qualified for the job,” says career coach Peter Yang. “This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor” If you show off your personality along with your skills while making a personal connection with your interviewer/recruiter then you can count that as a strong interview.

4. “Your references weren’t very flattering.”

Most recruiters won’t tell you if you had an unflattering reference that may confirm their doubts or concerns. Molad says. “Your references should talk about your strengths in specific situations — not just basic information.” Your references should be able to pull up examples of real projects where you successfully exceeded expectations and be able to bring up a situation where you showed your strength and skills.

“Bad references can ruin your candidacy as much as good ones can strengthen it,” says Sam Keefe, Digital Marketing Manager at AVID Technical Resources. Her advice - “Give only references who will say positive things about you. Work hard to build good working relationships with coworkers and bosses.”

5. “I back-channeled you, and found out the truth.”

Commonly known as a backdoor reference check (or off-sheet reference check), it refers to obtaining information about a candidate from a source other than those referrals specifically listed in the candidate's application. This is one of the sneaky ways hiring managers and recruiters gain insight on two things – personality traits and past performances..“This phenomenon is even more prevalent in the last five years or so because of LinkedIn’s growing popularity,” says Keefe. “Even if you choose not to give anybody there as a reference, backdoor references can reveal the skeletons in your closet.”


6. “We already gave the job to an in-house employee.”

Depending on the data source, companies report that between 15% to 28% of hires are internal. Some research even shows that internal hires for the most part excel at their task than external ones. However many companies post “phantom jobs“ where a role is posted online as a corporate process while they are already considering internal options. Some times recruiters have to go through the motions of interviewing outside candidates to be able to ensure a “fair“ hiring process. Therefore, Molad says, don’t expect recruiters to come right out and say, “It was a beauty parade to show management we ran a process, but it was a sham and you were never really considered.”

Instead, shake it off and keep on your search for a new job— there are plenty of opportunities out there, and the job that fits your life is just a few clicks away.

7. “Your last few social media posts were deal-breakers.”

70% of employers are snooping candidates’ social media profiles, which is up significantly from 60 percent in 2016. Recruiters are on the hunt for information that supports their qualifications for the job, if the candidate has a professional online persona at all, what other people are posting about the candidates, or for any reason at all not to hire a candidate.

“Hiring managers are reviewing social media pages to become educated about the background and brand the person is articulating and to look for red flags,” says Alan Weatherbee, senior vice president of talent search for Allison+Partners. “They aren’t using it to find ways not to hire someone who is qualified, but to make sure they present themselves in an accurate way.”

You want to make sure your social media pages are void of any political comments, inflammatory messages or anything else that might offend the person who might just hold your future in their hands.


8. “The team is dragging its feet waiting for another candidate’s response.”

You might just be a “Plan B” but your recruiter won’t just go out and say that. If it seems the candidate is dragging their feet and taking their time but keeping you somewhat in the loop — then they might have another candidate in the pipeline.

This should not be taken personally - it can be a very close race for the position and other times the other candidates fall out of the race because of personal circumstances, others jobs offers, or they decide the position isn’t for them. If you feel you may be in this runner-up position then now is your time to take the challenge to let convince your recruiter that you are fit and qualified for this position.

Always remember these "trade secrets” are kept with the business in mind, there is no malicious intent on anyones part. Many times candidates are faced with one or a multiple number of these roadblocks, but the best way around the issue is to be upfront with a recrutier and communicate your goals and concerns.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

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50% of Americans Are Skipping Their Lunch Breaks

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For one in two people, lunchtime is for crunching and cramming in more work. We shove snacks or meal-preps into our mouths while we type, plan, calculate, and schedule meetings. According to a new survey of 2,000 workers, it is unrealistic to be able to get away from your desk to eat a proper break. The research by OnePoll in partnership with Eggland’s Best, found that one in two Americans say that they cannot get in a full lunch break and that it even counts as a distraction. People seem to cling to their desk instead of going outside to eat in peace.

Lunch breaks are more vital than you think…

For the rest of us who take our lunch to enjoy some outside relaxation, a lunch breaks not just a getaway from out desk, but a moment to recharge for the last half of our workday. But this concept is generational. The group of works 45 and under claim that it was not practical to take a lunch break while the 45 plus age group gave a completely flipped response and disagreed.

“With a lot of work and little time in the day for themselves, the results indicated that eating habits are changing to suit such hectic routines, with an emphasis on snacking prioritized over lengthy meals. “ - source

When we skip our lunches we start picking at food throughout the day so we don’t get too hungry. According to swnsdigital 68% of American workers snack twice a day, and three in ten workers enjoy snacking three times a day or more while at work. All this snacking does not go without consequences. Research shows that eating frequently is actually unhealthy and detrimental to weight-loss goals. The latest endocrine science tells us that eating every three or four hours actually sets us up for not only exhaustion and premature aging but also less fat burning. A designated lunch break is not just a way of satisfying your hunger, but of also satisfying your unhealthy snacking habit.

Physical health reasons aside, a lunch break has a strong impact on the mental health benefits. In the U.S. half of the states do no mandate the employers to give their employees lunch breaks or a 10/15 min break, but research finds that breaks can replenish the psychological costs associated with working hard, improve work performance, and boost energy. Spending less than one minute looking at nature (Lee et al., 2015) improves employee performance after they return to the work task. Personally I have found that a complete lunch break gives me the metal and energy recharge for the second half of my day. It is a reminder that we are all people with lives outside of our meetings and deadlines and it gives us a fresh look on ideas and tasks when we return.

In the end if you have a lunch in your daily work schedule it is still up to you if you eat lunch at your computer non-stop working or cherish your gift of a break.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog


 


The Dos of Unemployment (and Don'ts)

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It's a frightening thought and position to be in when you find yourself unemployed. It's a place we hope we never find ourselves in, but we can all suddenly find ourselves in this predicament at any point in our lives. Regardless of our unemployment length, it can cause great damage to our finances and our mental health. We've outlined some steps you can take to limit the damage and impact of unemployment. These steps can also help you in the long run with your credit.

File for Unemployment

For some great in-depth tips on unemployment and filing for these benefits, you can take a look at this blog. The US government offers a safety net to eligible candidates so that you can have some cash coming your way while you are in job search mode. When you are working, you put part of your earnings into these programs so there should be no shame in taking advantage a program to help protect yourself when you're vulnerable.

Alert your Student Loan Provider

A second safety net can be deferment of your student loans.

"If you are experiencing financial hardship, go back to school, are unemployed, or are on active duty military service, postponing payments with deferment may be right for you. Subsidized Stafford loans and subsidized consolidation loans will not accrue additional interest" - source

Your student loan provider would rather you defer your loan to later than for you to default on your payments. They are willing to work with you, if you reach out to explain the situation. When your loans are in deferment you avoid late fees, penalties, and missed payments so you can protect your credit score.  Protecting your credit score keeps you in good shape to be able to take out loans in the future after you've landed your next position.

Apply for Marketplace Insurance

Losing your job and losing your health insurance go hand in hand but that doesn't have to be the case. 

"Since losing your job is considered a life event, you will be eligible to get insurance through the marketplace once you’re unemployed. Not only will this protect you if you have a health emergency while you’re unemployed (and allow you to get coverage for your existing needs), but it will also be much more affordable than other options, like COBRA." - Source

Begin your Job Hunt

To remain on unemployment you must apply to a minimum of three jobs a week, and provide proof. This helps you stay on top of your job search and provides you a guaranteed benefit check.

The best place to begin a job search is with people in your network! According to Payscale, "some estimate that upwards of 85 percent of open positions are filled through networking. If you’re looking for work, it might be better to put your time into building your professional network rather than pouring through all those listings online."

Reaching out to friends, family, and former colleagues can be the first step to your new job. They may not be able to land you a new opportunity, but they may be able to point you in the right direction.

Turn to your Emergency Savings

An emergency like this calls for use of your emergency savings. Hopefully you have been able to stash away some of your income for a moment like this. If you are still employed and have not, make sure to begin saving now! Your savings were meant for a moment like this. Your savings should be spend on housing, food, and bills to keep a roof over your head and your belly full.

Ask for Help 

You may be unemployed for longer than expected with a family to feed and watch after. In times like this it is okay to find some extra help from family or ask close friends to borrow money to pay back. Family and friends can offer borrowed money for less interest than banks so this can be helpful when you're tight on money. Remember to only borrow what you need and to create a repayment plan with deadlines and have it documented for both parties to agree on. Be honest about when you can repay and if you are having trouble repaying, make sure to communicate as this is important to not causing any problems in the relationship.

Don’t Borrow from your Retirement

If it'there's one thing you take away from this article, it's this: Dipping into your 401(k) plan is generally a bad idea.

Maggie Germano from The Ladder says "I will yell this from the rooftops for the rest of my life. Never borrow from your retirement! You will be much worse off later if you do this. -- If you borrow from your retirement account before the aged of 59.5, you’ll be penalized. You will have to pay taxes and fees for withdrawing early. This means that you will lose a lot of that money you’ve diligently saved for your retirement years. 

Don’t Rely on your Credit Cards

Credit cards are a slippery slope so avoiding credit card use as much as possible during your unemployment. This will help you avoid a hole of debt that you may not be able to climb out of even after landing you new job. 

If you do decide to turn to your credit cards, you do have a few options to limit your debt and avoiding some interest. Call your creditors and let them know about your situation. Creditors want to be paid back and if you can't pay, that hurts them so they are willing to work things out with you. You may be able to ask for a lower interest rate while you’re unemployed, so your interest charges don’t take over and make it impossible to repay.

Some credit cards have payment protection insurance for times like this. This insurance suspends your interest rates and you can pay your minimum payment for a short specified amount of months. This prevents you losing control of your debt and credit while you deal with finding your new job. This might be something to research if you are still employed and you think you might need it someday.

Can Healthcare Professionals Have Tattoos?

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Tattoos are becoming increasingly more popular and accepted in the US. They're cool, sexy, controversial and eye-catching; a tattoo makes a statement that a thousand words cannot. It is no surprise then that 36 percent of adults between the ages of 18 and 25 sport at least one of these markings somewhere on their bodies. As tattoos continue to gain popularity, they gain social acceptance as well. In certain professions, however, tattoos are still frowned upon by employers. Nursing, for the most part, is not one of them.

If you have tattoos and want a career as a healthcare professional, it may be comforting to learn that the healthcare profession as a whole is fairly accepting of tattoos and body art. For many nurses and doctors, tattoos are not an issue. Many healthcare professionals have easily concealable tattoos where they do not need to worry about it coming to the attention of a supervisor or a patient. Even difficult-to-hide tattoos can pass, as long as they are not excessively large or explicit.

Even thought most tattoos can be a non-issue at work, there are still some circumstances that may become a problem. Here are some examples:

Large Tattoos

Massive tattoos, or too many tattoos, can pose a real problem in the healthcare field. Not all employers are strict on their tattoos, but some facilities have dress codes that require all professionals to conceal their tattoos while on duty. Tattoos on your neck and arms will be difficult to keep out of sight, so employers with strict dress codes may not give you a chance and will disqualify you if they notice them at your interview. 

Employer Policy

Most facilities are somewhat lenient to visible tattoos, but this is not always the case.

"Some employers’ tattoo policies are stricter than others. For instance, there are still facilities out there that do not allow their nurses to have visible tattoos or body piercings of any kind. If you have tattoos in hard-to-cover locations, like your hands or neck, there’s a good chance you’ll have trouble meeting some potential employers’ dress-code policies." - Source

Offensive Tattoos

Harmless tattoos like names, hearts, music notes, and other innocent symbols won't cause much of an issue to most employers. Some tattoos could be considered offensive and shocking and this could affect your job search and even keeping your current position. It's best to play on the safe side and not display or tattoo any art that showcases nudity, drug use, or any art that can be connected to gangs. Any tattoos in these categories should be kept completely out of sight while working in the healthcare industry.

If one of these topics above are an issue for you, we have some ideas that will help you tackle most of the issues you may encounter while working in the field with tattoos:

 

Cover-Up Strategies

The best way to deal with the tattoo-healthcare field related issue is to avoid tattoos altogether. 

"If your current employer’s tattoo policy is fairly strict, simply keep your tattoos out of sight while at work. Long-sleeve shirts can be used to cover tattoos on the arms in most cases. Alternatively, skin-tone sleeves can be used to cover arm and leg tattoos without wearing an additional layer of clothing, which is great for the spring and summer months. For tattoos on the face and neck, try keeping your hair down to keep them out of sight. If that won’t work, there are special concealers that can be used to hide tattoos quite well."  - Source

Job-Hunting Tips

If hiding your tattoos daily is a deal breaker, then you should do a thorough research of possible employers and their dress codes before going in for your interview or sending in your resume. Most hospitals and large organizations have their policies posted on their website and if they do not, then asking someone (preferable a friend) can be another route. It may be more work, but it will all be worthwhile if this is an important issue to you, and you want to be stress-free about your tattoos in your workplace.

Tattoo Removal

If your tattoo(s) are destroying your chances at employment and opportunities, then you may have to remove them as a last resort. Unfortunately, this will take months-if not a year or more.

"Tattoos don't just disappear after a once-over with the laser. It takes a long time to complete because each time the tattoo is lasered, particles are broken down and digested by the body's immune system. The regeneration period is up to eight weeks, and the next time you go, the laser breaks down new particles of pigment. And so on and so forth." - Source

What are your thoughts on nurses, doctors, and other healthcare professionals with visible tattoos on duty? Should they be allowed or banned from the healthcare workplace? Leave your comments and thoughts below.

4 Reasons Nurses Quit (And What You Can Do Instead)

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It's been known for years that the gap between job openings in healthcare and the amount of people joining the workforce is opening wider and wider. There is a massive shortage of nurses in the workforce, with too many nurses leaving their careers prematurely.

Nurses exiting the workforce outnumber the amount of nurses entering the profession, and at the same time, many current nurses are inching closer and closer to retirement.

Patients' lives and health greatly depend on turning this around.

Nursing Supply and Demand

Nurse.org says approximately 50% of American nurses are over the age of 45. It’s predicted that the nursing shortage will worsen over the next ten years, in large part due to the number of nurses reaching retirement. 

Meanwhile, a lack of qualified instructors means that we turn away thousands of potential nursing students every year because we simply don’t have the capacity to teach them. 

Leaving in Droves

Aging and retirement are not the only reasons nurses are leaving in droves. There are many nurses with less than 10 years experience who leave their jobs early for their own reasons. Becoming a nurse requires jumping through many hurdles and hoops with years of schooling, testing, and hours of volunteer time, so it is concerning to see many nurses leaving what they worked so hard to get into.

Becoming a nurse is no easy task. Many personal, professional, and financial sacrifices are required, so when a nurse leaves the nursing profession, it’s cause for concern. 

Let’s talk about the top reasons nurses are leaving and how you can protect yourself from suffering the same fate.

1. Lack of Opportunity In Your Area

There’s no shortage of job opportunities for nurses in the current economy, but these jobs are relative to an individual’s life path.  

According to Nurse.org -- Many nurses are returning adult learners and second-degree students who’ve settled down, bought a home, and are likely to be married with children.  While there may be job opportunities in other locations, not everyone can uproot for a job. 

What to do: Understand your life goals (short, mid, and long term).  Does your specialty fit with your life needs? Can you get certified in a more in-demand specialty?

2. Get a Reality Check About Nursing

From the outside looking in, nursing can seem so different. Most do not understand what the job will look and feel like until they begin actually working in the field. There are so many unrealistic and warped portrayals of what the field is like. Movies, TV shows, and the internet will not give you a grasp on the difficulties of being a nurse. These often aren't discovered until you've already started with your license and you're on shift.

They say "Nursing isn't for everyone" and it's advice not to be taken lightly. All nurses will be put through the test mentally, physically, and emotionally. To be a nurse, you need to be skilled in multiple facets of life from time management, great communication skills, empathetic, patience, detailed, physical endurance and more on a daily basis. This nonstop marathon can be something many are not prepared to handle.

What to do: Ask, ask, ask, and find a mentor. Before you begin nursing school or before you begin working in the field, make sure to find a mentor or ask advice from experienced nurses you may know. This can really prepare you for your career.

 

3. Eating Our Young

This unfortunate scenario holds some validity in the real world of nursing. 

As a new nurse, you need strong coping mechanisms.  Lateral violence and workplace bullying are nursing’s dirty little secret, and while it’s not the standard,  bullying does exist. These poisonous actions are debilitating if you don’t have appropriate coping mechanisms.  

To be clear, it’s not just fellow nurses who are responsible for bullying and incivility.  In the world of healthcare, the human condition is unpredictable and emotionally charged.  Every member of the healthcare team – including patients, families, and doctors – can be both a target or a perpetrator. 

What to do: Ask yourself the following questions:

  • How can I better manage difficult people and stressful scenarios? 
  • Do I have skills for assertive communication?
  • Can I be more assertive in my communication?
  • Do I possess healthy coping mechanisms? 
  • How can I develop healthy coping mechanisms?
  • What can I do to maintain a good work/life balance?

4. Faster Pace

Nursing is not for the faint of heart. It will seem like a jolt to jump from nursing school to the fast paced real world working situations you will have to handle as a nurse. There are some things that going to school cannot prepare you for, and you must take the twists and turns and embrace the learning experiences that are to come.

What to do: Be prepared for the change in pace. While in nursing school, take the tougher assignments and challenge yourself to work and function as close to the real world as possible. Time management and delegation will be essential.

Stay Engaged

As you go on this path as a nurse, you must have a goal and direction. Stay up to date on healthcare, learn more about your profession, and remain a key team player at your facility.


Find an engaging nursing job you’ll love!

High-paying nursing opportunities are here and there is one just for you. As a registered nurse, you are in control of your career. Check out the best jobs from coast to coast on our job board. Get the pay and career path you deserve. Click here to see open positions for nurses now.

To connect with a recruiter call us at 909-545-6265 or email your resume to Staffing@ithstaffing.com. 

How To Select and Coach Your Job References

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A great reference will be your biggest cheerleader and your #1 fan! A well picked reference can single handedly convince the hiring manager that you are perfect for the role with their raving recommendation. On the flip side, a reference that has been placed on your resume in an careless manner can cost you the job you're chasing after.

"A hiring manager is influenced by whom they speak to and what they learn in those crucial job reference calls. They know that up to 81% of job seekers lie during job interviews, and they will be on the hunt to sniff out information about how excited and prepared you really are for the role." - Source

If you want the right information about your skills and energy, then you need to really think through who and why you select your pick of references. Once you have your references in order, it's time to prepare them for questions they may face. Here is how:

Give your job reference proper notice

It's common courtesy to give your job reference a heads up on the upcoming call from the hiring manager. The last thing you want is a "umm... I don't know who you're talking about?" when your unsuspecting reference is called out of the blue during a busy work day.  

The first step should always be to ask permission to list them as a reference so you don't intrusively push this role on them.  Fifteen percent of employees said they were putting down references who had no idea they were being listed as references. Don’t do this.

When you reach out to ask if someone can be a reference, you can feel out their excitement or dread to do so. This is vital to understand if someone truly wants to be a great reference and will put you in a good light for your new possible role. If you have any red flags or question what a reference may say about you, then it's best to keep them off your reference list.

Coach them about what kind of questions they’ll be asked

Monica Torres from The Ladder says "Once you’ve picked your team of cheerleaders, you need to coach them about what kind of questions they’ll be asked. There is no shame in updating them about what you have been up to in the last few months if this is someone you do not work with closely. Send them a copy of recent projects you have done, your resume and the cover letter you used to apply for the role. Recognize that different colleagues are able to speak about different skills. A peer will have different knowledge about your internal influence and leadership abilities than a boss." 

Know the role you are applying for. Your reference needs to be able to relay the qualities and skills the hiring manager is looking for so they can attest to your fit for the job. You want them to be able to answer on your SEO skills if the job calls for excellent SEO skills.  “Tell them why you believe the company wants to hire you and how you are likely to be useful for that company so they can reinforce that,” Priscilla Claman, the co-founder of Career Strategiesm, told Harvard Business Review. “One could talk about your ability to establish relationships with colleagues, another about your technical skills, and another about your project management abilities.”

Recognize that common reference questions will ask how you perform under adversity like “How well did the candidate perform under stressful conditions such as facing sale” or “Are there any areas that the candidate could use improvement?” If you know your reference may have a difficult time answering something similar to these questions, then it may mean you need to select a different reference. 
 

The vision of your character and skills that a hiring manager can see in you depends entirely on who you select as your references. They can see who you selected as your recommendations and that directly reflects on to you and who you are as a professional, in and out the workplace. Do your research and methodically select your team of references; they can be the key to landing your next opportunity.


Looking for a new opportunity ? Take a look at our job board here

To connect with a recruiter call us at 909-545-6265 or email your resume to Staffing@ithstaffing.com. 

4 Ways to Get Out of a Productivity Rut

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You can't have an all-star productive day every single day you walk into work. This is what you need to do once you are overloaded with distractions and are up to your neck in work.

 

Get Your Rest

Kristin Wong, a freelance writer and author of Get Money: Live the Life You Want, Not Just the Life You Can Affordwrites about this in Lifehacker (the piece is written with the idea that you’re normally able to get things done, but you experienced a “short-term setback.”

Wong’s first tip is to “get an early start.” - source

"So your binge of unproductivity is over and you’re now on the mend. Great! The first thing you can do is resolve to wake up earlier the following day.

“Let’s say you got jack done Monday. Once you realize the day has been a waste, make it a point to get to bed earlier that night, so you can get a head start on Tuesday (getting up early is hard, but lucky for you, we’ve got a whole list of ways to make it happen),” she writes. “When you get up that morning, don’t dive straight into work, though. Indulge in something you love. This starts your morning on an optimistic note, putting you in the right frame of mind for tackling the day. Instead of approaching it with the stress of having to catch up, stay calm and approach it optimistically and methodically.” 

 

Start all over again

Todd Henry, author of The Accidental Creative: How to Be Brilliant at a Moment’s Notice and more, told Fortune about how to do this when things aren’t going as planned in terms of everything you have to get done.

“Forget the original plan. … What would success look like now, given my new constraints? Which problems are the most important? What would be the most valuable use of my now reduced time?” he told the site.

You should get comfortable moving forward in a different way.

 

Go ahead and clean your desk.

Kate Hanley, a mindset coach and author of the forthcoming book A Year of Daily Calm speaks out on the topic to Fortune: “I find one small thing I can easily knock out even in that agitated state, and then I do something indulgent to reward myself.” Maybe it’s a bit of online shopping or a walk to get a coffee, but whatever it is, enjoy it. “The most destructive part of a day that feels off the rails is how much we beat ourselves up for it,” she says.

 

Feel free to switch gears for a moment

Amanda Zantal-Wiener is a writer for the HubSpot Marketing Blog, strategist, editor and owner of creative consultancy Amanda Zantal-Wiener, LLC. She writes on the HubSpot site about helping her mother with computer troubleshooting on her day off, it redirected her brain from her to-do-list to something else but when she was done with her "break" she was ready to go back to work and hit the ground running.

“If you’re feeling stuck, use your brain for something else. Maybe there’s a colleague who you’ve been meaning to get back to on an unrelated project, or maybe you just need to do a quick online puzzle. Keeping your mind active while giving it a break from the dredge of your to-do list might leave you feeling re-energized and ready to hit the ground running, wherever you left off,” she writes.

Don’t be afraid to do this.


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Looking for a new opportunity ? Take a look at our job board here

To connect with a recruiter call us at 909-545-6265 or email your resume to Staffing@ithstaffing.com. 

Professional Voicemail 101

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In the modern day and age, it is simpler to email someone in a moment than to pick up the phone and call them . Leaving a proper professional voicemail has become a forgotten art. We have all had that moment of panic after the "BEEP" and rambled and stumbled through our introduction and message on the phone, so we should all recognize the need to master the skill of a proper voicemail.

Whether this is part of your daily workflow, or if this is a once in a while task, here is the breakdown of a great voicemail.

Get to the point and then hang up...

First thing first, you need to pin point the exact reason for leaving a voicemail in the first place - to get a call back. There is no need to fluff here. This is a case of stating who and why and leave the rest for the call back when you're both on the line ready to discuss.

After the "beep" is your moment - state your name and contact number with a, "Hello, this is [NAME], I'm calling you from [YOUR JOB] to [REASON FOR THIS CALL]. My number is 555-555-5555." Restate your name and contact info once more at the end to wrap it up and you've successfully left a concise, professional, to-the-point voicemail worthy of a call back.  

"As Tori Keith wrote for the women lawyer’s advocacy group Ms. JD, “A good rule of thumb is 40 seconds. Anything longer risks getting deleted or ignored. Repeat your name and number at the end of the message too, as sometimes a message will cut out or be hard to hear.” - Source

Smartphones today now have a handy feature that automatically creates a transcription of your call, so avoid awkward "uhhs" and "umms". Practice recording your voicemail message so you can nail it when the time comes. It may be easy to get nervous when it's a one way conversation with no one to cut you off, so it can be helpful to write down your message, practice, and read off your notes. Check the speed of your voice and make sure to speak clearly at a slow pace (but not too slow). 

*Transcription example

*Transcription example

 

Proficiency in the art of the voicemail will be key at any stage of your career and life. The key is being considerate to the receiver of the voicemail. You wouldn't want to receive a voicemail that drags on with no meaning, so be thoughtful when leaving voicemail messages.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

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This is the one and ONLY reason to have a morning routine

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They say the early bird catches the worm, and it seems like people with morning routines are just winning at life.

In our eyes, it appears they had a hearty breakfast of champions with fresh fruit, milk, and juice, dressed professionally with no wrinkles, have a clean cut with perfect hair, and the kids are ready and dropped off to school in time, all neat and tidy before going in to work.


Early Risers Benefits Infograph

- Info graph Source

 

Wake Up With a Mission

If you truly want to have a morning routine that really accomplishes something Laura Vanderkam, time management expert and author of Off the Clock: Feel Less Busy While Getting More Done says this is the secret. - Source

“Think about what would make you excited to get out of bed. There’s no reason to have a morning routine just to have a morning routine,” she told Ladders. “The reason to do it is that there’s something cool you want to do in your life that is not fitting in your life otherwise.

“For many people, that’s something like exercise because it is hard to fit it in the rest of the day or creative pursuits like writing a novel. You are probably too tired at the end of the day to write,  but if you get up in the morning, it could work. Or maybe it’s family time and a dinner just doesn’t work so go for family breakfast. This is anything you want to have in your life that you can’t make space for otherwise.”

 

Marie Kondo your morning

It’s similar to Marie Kondo-ing your life, you are just doing it with your morning. You want to be getting up for something that brings joy into your life. If you are just doing it to say you did it, that is just adding more clutter. 

This new mindset can put less pressure on yourself and your day to figure out what you really want to get out of your morning routine. Going to bed early opens up this wide space for a morning routine. “Going to bed early is how grownups sleep in! If you go to bed earlier, you can get up earlier,” she said. 


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

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Sitting at Work is Killing You: The Truth About Your Desk Job

Sitting at Work is Killing You: The Truth About Your Desk Job

When you're at work on the grind it may be the last thing on your mind how your work is affecting your overall heath.

A few hours of overtime here and there is the norm as it takes over time you might spend in the gym or on some active hobbies. Your job may even steal your morning away from you as you dive into stopped traffic early to head to work instead of being able to go on a job or hit an early workout.


Millennials On The Move: What to Know About Relocating for a New Job

relocating to a new job

Have you ever been on a job search and found a position that matches your skills and endeavors to the T or received an offer letter from an organization you were really interested in ...then realized this office is in another state? The thought of picking yourself up and moving to a brand new city and state can seem like a crazy idea, but if you take a closer look, you may be in for an amazing opportunity.

"And according to a report from The United States Census Bureau, you are not alone. Millennials accounted for over 40% of all movers between 2007 and 2012, despite making up less than a quarter of the U.S. population." - Source

As young millennials with the probability of no mortgages, spouses, or children, what is holding you back from that new position that can fast track your career to the next level? As long as this new position can keep you financially stable, it may be time to try something new.

Relocating your life to a new city can often lead you down a new road full of opportunities that you would not normally be exposed to back in your home town. A fresh place calls for brand new friendships and memories in a city you've never experienced before. You can stay as long or as short as you'd like and start anew in a new city.

Here are a few tips to consider when deciding to move for a work-related opportunity.

1. Finances

Before diving into that new opportunity, it is key to have your finances in order. Is the position able to cover the cost of living in the area? Will you be living well-off on your new salary or will you have to budget and are you okay with that? Living in New York City has a high cost of living; that same salary in Arizona can get you much more financial freedom and flexibility. Whatever your reason for moving, make sure it makes sense for your pocket. 

2. Finding Sublets & Housing

Finding housing is a lot simpler than it used to be, it can now be as easy as a few clicks on the internet to find your new home. If you have friends or family in the area, this can be a good way to get direction for where to look and what to look out for. Sometimes friend and family can offer a room for rent at a low friendly cost.  If you don't have any connections to the area, there are listings on Facebook, Craigslist, Rentler and Roomster. These are great places to begin your search.

3. Friendships

Making friends in a new location begins with you. "It’s only natural to want to build connections with people who look like you and be able to find services that cater to your background (hair salons, barber shops, churches, etc.). If social life and community building are important to you, as it is in my case, actually consider putting effort into it. Attend company affinity network events, seek out young professional social mixers (quick plug for Jopwell #SummerUnlocked events), reach out to college alumni at your firm, use social media resources – be a friend. More often than not, there are other students and young professionals in your same situation looking to make connections with people just like you." - Source

4. Fun

Every place comes with unique social experiences particular to their city, from the brunch day parties in Washington, D.C. to the live music scene in Austin, TX. Keep an open mind and check out social scenes that you maybe have never experienced before. - Source

Keep an open mind and an eye out for fun activity options, you will experience new social scenes you might have never thought you'd enjoy.

5. Future

Who said this was a permanent decision? Take that leap and if it doesn't work out then you can always try something new, there are hundreds of other beautiful cities waiting for you to explore. 


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If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

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