How To Explain An Employment Gap In Your Resume (It's not as bad as you think)

How To Explain An Employment Gap In Your Resume (It's not as bad as you think)

Today w’re diving into how to structure gaps of unemployment within your resume and how to address it during an interview. But before we even get started, lets’ address a couple of things. If you've been actively in the job market for more than a month, you really want to 10x your efforts. The longer you're out of the job market, the harder it is to find a job. If you're at that six weeks mark, four weeks mark, or more, I would advise that you make sure that you're networking. Connect with individuals and companies on all social media platforms, not just LinkedIn, but also Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Make your presence known. If you've been in the job market for more than six weeks, it is time to 10x your efforts going into next week to make sure that you are stacking the deck in your favor, and that you're being aggressive and being very intentional with your job search. Alright, so let's talk about gaps of unemployment!

Will Artificial Intelligence Take My Job? (A Quick Assessment For Your Role)

Will Artificial Intelligence Take My Job? (A Quick Assessment For Your Role)

As you all know, there's a lot of talk about how many jobs that are well on their way to be eliminated due to artificial intelligence. There's no secret that millions of jobs are going to be eliminated due to robotics entering the workplace to increase efficiency and accuracy. Advancements in technology are not necessarily a bad thing, but it's something that you should be aware of, especially if your job can be automated.

How do we analyze if your job is at risk of being outsourced or replaced by artificial intelligence? You can ask yourself a series of questions.

What Colors to Wear (And Avoid) During Your Next Interview

What Colors to Wear (And Avoid) During Your Next Interview

Believe it or not, but the color of your interview attire can have an impact on how you are perceived during your interview.

Today we're going to talk about colors. What color suit or outfit you wear to your job interview? It's a really, really important question that is often overlooked. Color can dramatically affect the first five seconds on your interviewer so it's important to take some time to put some effort into it. For example, if you wear a red tie, you run the risk of being seen as overly assertive, dominant, and possibly a little bit arrogant. If you wear yellow or orange, you maybe seem off the wall, and you may not even be taken seriously. But for some professions though the rules can bend and switch depending on the the position you are interviewing for or the company culture. Red may be useful: for example, sales companies are often interested in overly confident candidates so if you're sporting a suit and you slip on on a red tie, that would be great for somebody who's interviewing for a sales position.

5 Tips For an Efficient Job Search in 2019

5 Tips For an Efficient Job Search in 2019

Number one: Have different versions of your resume ready to go.

This will require you taking some time to think about what are the top five positions that you wanna go for. Make sure that you're clear on the titles and then customize each resume specific to that position. Remember, A.I. is huge right now and so there's a lot of screening of resumes for very specific key words, so make sure that the key words that are related to the job that you want to go for can be found in your resume.

12 things on your work desk that are making you look unprofessional

12 things on your work desk that are making you look unprofessional

Some people would argue that a messy desk is a sign of genius — and actual geniuses like Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs would seem to be among them.

Others, like the people who actually work with and beside you, might find your mess less than endearing.

And beyond clutter, items that are varying degrees of inappropriate and downright disgusting are among the biggest workplace offenders, according to the human resources professionals we interviewed.

Here are a dozen desk “don’ts” that make you look less than professional.

5 ways to bounce back if you’re fired

5 ways to bounce back if you’re fired

The sudden notice of your last day at your job can be tough, no matter how many inspiration stories you hear.

You are not alone, the past has shown that even trailblazers have been fired from their positions before finding success in their chosen field.

Steve Jobs was just 30 years old, wildly successful, fabulously wealthy and a global celebrity. And then it all came crashing down when he was forced out of his own billion-dollar company he had sacrificed everything to build. Anna Wintour was fired from her first job as a junior fashion editor at Harper's Bazaar. She made waves for her innovative shoots, but editor Tony Mazalla thought they were a little too edgy and she got canned after a mere nine months.  Walt Disney had a similar story, being fired from the Kansas City star for “lack of imagination and no good ideas.”

30 Days Down at Your New Job, What Now?

30 Days Down at Your New Job, What Now?

After the exciting initial days on the job, it’s time to settle into your role. The goal in this first month is to learn how you can apply your skill set to the challenges and opportunities facing this organization.

In the first month you should:

1. Get to know your team better. It’s important to continue making new connections and allowing others to know you, too. By simply being around your new team and attentively observing how everyone works and collaborates, you’ll gain valuable insights about the company and group culture.

2. Get organized and set good habits. This job is a fresh start and a good opportunity to shed old routines. Take these first weeks to decide how you want to organize your calendar and to-do lists, how you’ll manage your time and the skills or practices you want to develop.

10 Career Tips I'd Tell Younger Me

Hindsight is 20/20 so let’s look back and see what we’ve learned from our experience in the field.

When you’re a newbie in the first early years of your field or beginning your job hunt, there is not much to go off of to avoid pitfalls and easy mistakes. You just don’t have a storage of experience and mistakes where you can look back and figure out your next move. The one thing you have is your gut to go one and a little bit of luck.

Interview Question 101: “What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?"

Interview Question 101: “What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?"

The cliché question arises in almost every interview:

Describe your personal strengths and weaknesses.

The question in straight forward but seems like a trick question but if you establish an appropriate context, then you can give an honest and well thought answer. Answering this way will showcase your professionalism & awareness. A hiring manager or recruiter ask these types of questions to qualify or disqualify you as the type of person who would excel in this specific position.