Job Search

Interview Question 101: “What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?"

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The cliché question arises in almost every interview:

Describe your personal strengths and weaknesses.

The question in straight forward but seems like a trick question but if you establish an appropriate context, then you can give an honest and well thought answer. Answering this way will showcase your professionalism & awareness. A hiring manager or recruiter ask these types of questions to qualify or disqualify you as the type of person who would excel in this specific position.

Even if you are not directly asked this question it is still a great way to prepare and frame your interview about what you can bring to the table. When you are prepared for these questions, it sets you up to answer almost any popular interview question.

What is considered a strength or weakness is different for almost every position. What is a weakness in one role can be considered a strength in a different role. There are a general scope of strengths and weaknesses that should be mentions during the interview.

Examples of General Strengths: Analytical, communication, leadership skills, team player

Examples of General Weaknesses: Hard & soft skills, and examples on how to spin your weaknesses so they don’t knock out out of the running for the role.


“What Are Your Greatest WEAKNESSES?”

The focus is on the job description so all your answers whether a strength or a weakness should be tailored to the position you are interviewing for. For example, if this role requires a lot of team projects and tasks, you would want to tailor in the fact that you are a crystal clear communicator who excels in managing and or working under a spectrum of people for a common goal.

When on the topic about weaknesses make sure to avoid any weakness that would automatically disqualify you for the position. For example, if the job requires a lot of designing and writing, do not say your weakness is creativity. No matter what weakness you mention, make sure you have a positive spin on your answer.

As an example you might want to bring up your weakness and explain it as a strength:


Example: I can be very critical of my work. Often after a project I have always felt I could have done more even thought I can look back and say I’ve done well. This pattern has left me burnt out and negative. I have decided in the past two years to make mental notes of my achievements and do little things to celebrate them. This has helped shift my thinking and to appreciate my team and other who support me”

It is only natural to have weaknesses and we rarely want to put them out there on display to someone we’ve just met, but a truthful answer can help show your fit within the organization.

Some examples of weaknesses include:

  • Unorganized

  • Critical / Sensitive

  • Perfectionism (Note: this can be a strength in many roles, make sure to give an example how perfectionism has posed a problem for you)

  • Shy / Not adept at public speaking

  • Competitive (Note: Similarly to perfectionism, this can be a strength)

  • Limited experience in a non-essential skill (especially if obvious on your resume, face this one head on)

  • Not skilled at delegating tasks

  • Take on too much responsibility

  • Not detail-oriented / Too detail-oriented

  • Not comfortable taking risks

  • Too focused / Lack of focus


Examples of Strengths

If you aren’t sure about your strengths, ask coworkers, your past managers, and friends what they see as your strongest qualities.

Some examples of strengths include:

  • Creative

  • Patient

  • Empathetic

  • Determined

  • Flexible / Versatile

  • Honest

  • Enthusiastic / Passionate / Driven

  • Collaborative

  • Disciplined / Focused

  • Committed / Dedicated

  • Respectful

  • Innovative

  • Attentive / Detail-oriented

  • Action-oriented/entrepreneurial

Some final points to keep in mind when these questions come up:

  • Remember to tailor your answer to the job description

  • Not be overly humble, and

  • Be specific in your responses. (specific situation where you were weak or strong)

When prepared, your answer this this question can really get a clear picture of who you are and how you would fit into the role. Turn your weaknesses into challenges you’re on your way to conquer and your strengths into the reasons why you should be placed perfectly into your new role.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

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8 Secrets Recruiters Won’t Tell You (But REALLY REALLY Want To)

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Working with a recruiter may seem intimidating but recruiters truly want the best for both the candidates and the company they are recruiting for. Their goal is set up a great pairing that is set for success through the application, interview process, all the way to your first day and beyond. Even though a recruiter is doing their best for you, there are some things that recruiters can’t share.

Salary caps, candidate competition, internal HR tactics — let’s call them trade secrets. They are the confidential information that, unfortunately, recruiters cannot hand out.

Omer Molad, CEO/Founder of Vervoe, gives a few secrets out.

1. “We could have gone higher if you had negotiated.”

Salary negotiations “are like a game of poker — both job seekers and recruiters are trying to maintain control and win the hand.”

Recruiters will not tell you exactly what the company values you for, you have to know your own value. Each role has a salary range a recruiter can work with but their initial offering is rarely at the top of this range, so you must view their first offer as a starting point. - Benefits like vacation, work hours, etc. can usually be negotiated.


2. “Don’t go overboard with buzzwords — we can tell.”

It’s key to include keywords in your resume and to showcase your knowledgeable about your particular industry. However, “don’t try to look smarter than you really are,” says Molad. People forget that recruiters also want your personality to shine through to make sure it meshes well with the positions and the company culture. Tossing out big words and phrases can just get in the way and backfire.

“It’s not about specific questions or answers that stand out, but rather the candidates who display a great deal of passion about what they do that really stand above the rest,” says employer Academy Sports + Outdoors.

3. “You never had a chance after that bad first impression.”

You get one chance at a first impression and this goes especially true in your career. According to Molad, few recruiters can get past a bad first impression. Unreturned calls and emails, bad manners, tardiness to interviews, and interview slip ups will damage your chances of landing that position. Rarely will a recruiter let you know “We just don’t like you.”

“Interviewers often care more about the likability of entry-level candidates than whether or not they’re actually qualified for the job,” says career coach Peter Yang. “This is because the person interviewing you will often also be your future boss and mentor” If you show off your personality along with your skills while making a personal connection with your interviewer/recruiter then you can count that as a strong interview.

4. “Your references weren’t very flattering.”

Most recruiters won’t tell you if you had an unflattering reference that may confirm their doubts or concerns. Molad says. “Your references should talk about your strengths in specific situations — not just basic information.” Your references should be able to pull up examples of real projects where you successfully exceeded expectations and be able to bring up a situation where you showed your strength and skills.

“Bad references can ruin your candidacy as much as good ones can strengthen it,” says Sam Keefe, Digital Marketing Manager at AVID Technical Resources. Her advice - “Give only references who will say positive things about you. Work hard to build good working relationships with coworkers and bosses.”

5. “I back-channeled you, and found out the truth.”

Commonly known as a backdoor reference check (or off-sheet reference check), it refers to obtaining information about a candidate from a source other than those referrals specifically listed in the candidate's application. This is one of the sneaky ways hiring managers and recruiters gain insight on two things – personality traits and past performances..“This phenomenon is even more prevalent in the last five years or so because of LinkedIn’s growing popularity,” says Keefe. “Even if you choose not to give anybody there as a reference, backdoor references can reveal the skeletons in your closet.”


6. “We already gave the job to an in-house employee.”

Depending on the data source, companies report that between 15% to 28% of hires are internal. Some research even shows that internal hires for the most part excel at their task than external ones. However many companies post “phantom jobs“ where a role is posted online as a corporate process while they are already considering internal options. Some times recruiters have to go through the motions of interviewing outside candidates to be able to ensure a “fair“ hiring process. Therefore, Molad says, don’t expect recruiters to come right out and say, “It was a beauty parade to show management we ran a process, but it was a sham and you were never really considered.”

Instead, shake it off and keep on your search for a new job— there are plenty of opportunities out there, and the job that fits your life is just a few clicks away.

7. “Your last few social media posts were deal-breakers.”

70% of employers are snooping candidates’ social media profiles, which is up significantly from 60 percent in 2016. Recruiters are on the hunt for information that supports their qualifications for the job, if the candidate has a professional online persona at all, what other people are posting about the candidates, or for any reason at all not to hire a candidate.

“Hiring managers are reviewing social media pages to become educated about the background and brand the person is articulating and to look for red flags,” says Alan Weatherbee, senior vice president of talent search for Allison+Partners. “They aren’t using it to find ways not to hire someone who is qualified, but to make sure they present themselves in an accurate way.”

You want to make sure your social media pages are void of any political comments, inflammatory messages or anything else that might offend the person who might just hold your future in their hands.


8. “The team is dragging its feet waiting for another candidate’s response.”

You might just be a “Plan B” but your recruiter won’t just go out and say that. If it seems the candidate is dragging their feet and taking their time but keeping you somewhat in the loop — then they might have another candidate in the pipeline.

This should not be taken personally - it can be a very close race for the position and other times the other candidates fall out of the race because of personal circumstances, others jobs offers, or they decide the position isn’t for them. If you feel you may be in this runner-up position then now is your time to take the challenge to let convince your recruiter that you are fit and qualified for this position.

Always remember these "trade secrets” are kept with the business in mind, there is no malicious intent on anyones part. Many times candidates are faced with one or a multiple number of these roadblocks, but the best way around the issue is to be upfront with a recrutier and communicate your goals and concerns.


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!


The Dos of Unemployment (and Don'ts)

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It's a frightening thought and position to be in when you find yourself unemployed. It's a place we hope we never find ourselves in, but we can all suddenly find ourselves in this predicament at any point in our lives. Regardless of our unemployment length, it can cause great damage to our finances and our mental health. We've outlined some steps you can take to limit the damage and impact of unemployment. These steps can also help you in the long run with your credit.

File for Unemployment

For some great in-depth tips on unemployment and filing for these benefits, you can take a look at this blog. The US government offers a safety net to eligible candidates so that you can have some cash coming your way while you are in job search mode. When you are working, you put part of your earnings into these programs so there should be no shame in taking advantage a program to help protect yourself when you're vulnerable.

Alert your Student Loan Provider

A second safety net can be deferment of your student loans.

"If you are experiencing financial hardship, go back to school, are unemployed, or are on active duty military service, postponing payments with deferment may be right for you. Subsidized Stafford loans and subsidized consolidation loans will not accrue additional interest" - source

Your student loan provider would rather you defer your loan to later than for you to default on your payments. They are willing to work with you, if you reach out to explain the situation. When your loans are in deferment you avoid late fees, penalties, and missed payments so you can protect your credit score.  Protecting your credit score keeps you in good shape to be able to take out loans in the future after you've landed your next position.

Apply for Marketplace Insurance

Losing your job and losing your health insurance go hand in hand but that doesn't have to be the case. 

"Since losing your job is considered a life event, you will be eligible to get insurance through the marketplace once you’re unemployed. Not only will this protect you if you have a health emergency while you’re unemployed (and allow you to get coverage for your existing needs), but it will also be much more affordable than other options, like COBRA." - Source

Begin your Job Hunt

To remain on unemployment you must apply to a minimum of three jobs a week, and provide proof. This helps you stay on top of your job search and provides you a guaranteed benefit check.

The best place to begin a job search is with people in your network! According to Payscale, "some estimate that upwards of 85 percent of open positions are filled through networking. If you’re looking for work, it might be better to put your time into building your professional network rather than pouring through all those listings online."

Reaching out to friends, family, and former colleagues can be the first step to your new job. They may not be able to land you a new opportunity, but they may be able to point you in the right direction.

Turn to your Emergency Savings

An emergency like this calls for use of your emergency savings. Hopefully you have been able to stash away some of your income for a moment like this. If you are still employed and have not, make sure to begin saving now! Your savings were meant for a moment like this. Your savings should be spend on housing, food, and bills to keep a roof over your head and your belly full.

Ask for Help 

You may be unemployed for longer than expected with a family to feed and watch after. In times like this it is okay to find some extra help from family or ask close friends to borrow money to pay back. Family and friends can offer borrowed money for less interest than banks so this can be helpful when you're tight on money. Remember to only borrow what you need and to create a repayment plan with deadlines and have it documented for both parties to agree on. Be honest about when you can repay and if you are having trouble repaying, make sure to communicate as this is important to not causing any problems in the relationship.

Don’t Borrow from your Retirement

If it'there's one thing you take away from this article, it's this: Dipping into your 401(k) plan is generally a bad idea.

Maggie Germano from The Ladder says "I will yell this from the rooftops for the rest of my life. Never borrow from your retirement! You will be much worse off later if you do this. -- If you borrow from your retirement account before the aged of 59.5, you’ll be penalized. You will have to pay taxes and fees for withdrawing early. This means that you will lose a lot of that money you’ve diligently saved for your retirement years. 

Don’t Rely on your Credit Cards

Credit cards are a slippery slope so avoiding credit card use as much as possible during your unemployment. This will help you avoid a hole of debt that you may not be able to climb out of even after landing you new job. 

If you do decide to turn to your credit cards, you do have a few options to limit your debt and avoiding some interest. Call your creditors and let them know about your situation. Creditors want to be paid back and if you can't pay, that hurts them so they are willing to work things out with you. You may be able to ask for a lower interest rate while you’re unemployed, so your interest charges don’t take over and make it impossible to repay.

Some credit cards have payment protection insurance for times like this. This insurance suspends your interest rates and you can pay your minimum payment for a short specified amount of months. This prevents you losing control of your debt and credit while you deal with finding your new job. This might be something to research if you are still employed and you think you might need it someday.

4 Reasons Nurses Quit (And What You Can Do Instead)

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It's been known for years that the gap between job openings in healthcare and the amount of people joining the workforce is opening wider and wider. There is a massive shortage of nurses in the workforce, with too many nurses leaving their careers prematurely.

Nurses exiting the workforce outnumber the amount of nurses entering the profession, and at the same time, many current nurses are inching closer and closer to retirement.

Patients' lives and health greatly depend on turning this around.

Nursing Supply and Demand

Nurse.org says approximately 50% of American nurses are over the age of 45. It’s predicted that the nursing shortage will worsen over the next ten years, in large part due to the number of nurses reaching retirement. 

Meanwhile, a lack of qualified instructors means that we turn away thousands of potential nursing students every year because we simply don’t have the capacity to teach them. 

Leaving in Droves

Aging and retirement are not the only reasons nurses are leaving in droves. There are many nurses with less than 10 years experience who leave their jobs early for their own reasons. Becoming a nurse requires jumping through many hurdles and hoops with years of schooling, testing, and hours of volunteer time, so it is concerning to see many nurses leaving what they worked so hard to get into.

Becoming a nurse is no easy task. Many personal, professional, and financial sacrifices are required, so when a nurse leaves the nursing profession, it’s cause for concern. 

Let’s talk about the top reasons nurses are leaving and how you can protect yourself from suffering the same fate.

1. Lack of Opportunity In Your Area

There’s no shortage of job opportunities for nurses in the current economy, but these jobs are relative to an individual’s life path.  

According to Nurse.org -- Many nurses are returning adult learners and second-degree students who’ve settled down, bought a home, and are likely to be married with children.  While there may be job opportunities in other locations, not everyone can uproot for a job. 

What to do: Understand your life goals (short, mid, and long term).  Does your specialty fit with your life needs? Can you get certified in a more in-demand specialty?

2. Get a Reality Check About Nursing

From the outside looking in, nursing can seem so different. Most do not understand what the job will look and feel like until they begin actually working in the field. There are so many unrealistic and warped portrayals of what the field is like. Movies, TV shows, and the internet will not give you a grasp on the difficulties of being a nurse. These often aren't discovered until you've already started with your license and you're on shift.

They say "Nursing isn't for everyone" and it's advice not to be taken lightly. All nurses will be put through the test mentally, physically, and emotionally. To be a nurse, you need to be skilled in multiple facets of life from time management, great communication skills, empathetic, patience, detailed, physical endurance and more on a daily basis. This nonstop marathon can be something many are not prepared to handle.

What to do: Ask, ask, ask, and find a mentor. Before you begin nursing school or before you begin working in the field, make sure to find a mentor or ask advice from experienced nurses you may know. This can really prepare you for your career.

 

3. Eating Our Young

This unfortunate scenario holds some validity in the real world of nursing. 

As a new nurse, you need strong coping mechanisms.  Lateral violence and workplace bullying are nursing’s dirty little secret, and while it’s not the standard,  bullying does exist. These poisonous actions are debilitating if you don’t have appropriate coping mechanisms.  

To be clear, it’s not just fellow nurses who are responsible for bullying and incivility.  In the world of healthcare, the human condition is unpredictable and emotionally charged.  Every member of the healthcare team – including patients, families, and doctors – can be both a target or a perpetrator. 

What to do: Ask yourself the following questions:

  • How can I better manage difficult people and stressful scenarios? 
  • Do I have skills for assertive communication?
  • Can I be more assertive in my communication?
  • Do I possess healthy coping mechanisms? 
  • How can I develop healthy coping mechanisms?
  • What can I do to maintain a good work/life balance?

4. Faster Pace

Nursing is not for the faint of heart. It will seem like a jolt to jump from nursing school to the fast paced real world working situations you will have to handle as a nurse. There are some things that going to school cannot prepare you for, and you must take the twists and turns and embrace the learning experiences that are to come.

What to do: Be prepared for the change in pace. While in nursing school, take the tougher assignments and challenge yourself to work and function as close to the real world as possible. Time management and delegation will be essential.

Stay Engaged

As you go on this path as a nurse, you must have a goal and direction. Stay up to date on healthcare, learn more about your profession, and remain a key team player at your facility.


Find an engaging nursing job you’ll love!

High-paying nursing opportunities are here and there is one just for you. As a registered nurse, you are in control of your career. Check out the best jobs from coast to coast on our job board. Get the pay and career path you deserve. Click here to see open positions for nurses now.

To connect with a recruiter call us at 909-545-6265 or email your resume to Staffing@ithstaffing.com. 

How To Select and Coach Your Job References

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A great reference will be your biggest cheerleader and your #1 fan! A well picked reference can single handedly convince the hiring manager that you are perfect for the role with their raving recommendation. On the flip side, a reference that has been placed on your resume in an careless manner can cost you the job you're chasing after.

"A hiring manager is influenced by whom they speak to and what they learn in those crucial job reference calls. They know that up to 81% of job seekers lie during job interviews, and they will be on the hunt to sniff out information about how excited and prepared you really are for the role." - Source

If you want the right information about your skills and energy, then you need to really think through who and why you select your pick of references. Once you have your references in order, it's time to prepare them for questions they may face. Here is how:

Give your job reference proper notice

It's common courtesy to give your job reference a heads up on the upcoming call from the hiring manager. The last thing you want is a "umm... I don't know who you're talking about?" when your unsuspecting reference is called out of the blue during a busy work day.  

The first step should always be to ask permission to list them as a reference so you don't intrusively push this role on them.  Fifteen percent of employees said they were putting down references who had no idea they were being listed as references. Don’t do this.

When you reach out to ask if someone can be a reference, you can feel out their excitement or dread to do so. This is vital to understand if someone truly wants to be a great reference and will put you in a good light for your new possible role. If you have any red flags or question what a reference may say about you, then it's best to keep them off your reference list.

Coach them about what kind of questions they’ll be asked

Monica Torres from The Ladder says "Once you’ve picked your team of cheerleaders, you need to coach them about what kind of questions they’ll be asked. There is no shame in updating them about what you have been up to in the last few months if this is someone you do not work with closely. Send them a copy of recent projects you have done, your resume and the cover letter you used to apply for the role. Recognize that different colleagues are able to speak about different skills. A peer will have different knowledge about your internal influence and leadership abilities than a boss." 

Know the role you are applying for. Your reference needs to be able to relay the qualities and skills the hiring manager is looking for so they can attest to your fit for the job. You want them to be able to answer on your SEO skills if the job calls for excellent SEO skills.  “Tell them why you believe the company wants to hire you and how you are likely to be useful for that company so they can reinforce that,” Priscilla Claman, the co-founder of Career Strategiesm, told Harvard Business Review. “One could talk about your ability to establish relationships with colleagues, another about your technical skills, and another about your project management abilities.”

Recognize that common reference questions will ask how you perform under adversity like “How well did the candidate perform under stressful conditions such as facing sale” or “Are there any areas that the candidate could use improvement?” If you know your reference may have a difficult time answering something similar to these questions, then it may mean you need to select a different reference. 
 

The vision of your character and skills that a hiring manager can see in you depends entirely on who you select as your references. They can see who you selected as your recommendations and that directly reflects on to you and who you are as a professional, in and out the workplace. Do your research and methodically select your team of references; they can be the key to landing your next opportunity.


Looking for a new opportunity ? Take a look at our job board here

To connect with a recruiter call us at 909-545-6265 or email your resume to Staffing@ithstaffing.com. 

Millennials On The Move: What to Know About Relocating for a New Job

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Have you ever been on a job search and found a position that matches your skills and endeavors to the T or received an offer letter from an organization you were really interested in ...then realized this office is in another state? The thought of picking yourself up and moving to a brand new city and state can seem like a crazy idea, but if you take a closer look, you may be in for an amazing opportunity.

"And according to a report from The United States Census Bureau, you are not alone. Millennials accounted for over 40% of all movers between 2007 and 2012, despite making up less than a quarter of the U.S. population." - Source

As young millennials with the probability of no mortgages, spouses, or children, what is holding you back from that new position that can fast track your career to the next level? As long as this new position can keep you financially stable, it may be time to try something new.

Relocating your life to a new city can often lead you down a new road full of opportunities that you would not normally be exposed to back in your home town. A fresh place calls for brand new friendships and memories in a city you've never experienced before. You can stay as long or as short as you'd like and start anew in a new city.

Here are a few tips to consider when deciding to move for a work-related opportunity.

1. Finances

Before diving into that new opportunity, it is key to have your finances in order. Is the position able to cover the cost of living in the area? Will you be living well-off on your new salary or will you have to budget and are you okay with that? Living in New York City has a high cost of living; that same salary in Arizona can get you much more financial freedom and flexibility. Whatever your reason for moving, make sure it makes sense for your pocket. 

2. Finding Sublets & Housing

Finding housing is a lot simpler than it used to be, it can now be as easy as a few clicks on the internet to find your new home. If you have friends or family in the area, this can be a good way to get direction for where to look and what to look out for. Sometimes friend and family can offer a room for rent at a low friendly cost.  If you don't have any connections to the area, there are listings on Facebook, Craigslist, Rentler and Roomster. These are great places to begin your search.

3. Friendships

Making friends in a new location begins with you. "It’s only natural to want to build connections with people who look like you and be able to find services that cater to your background (hair salons, barber shops, churches, etc.). If social life and community building are important to you, as it is in my case, actually consider putting effort into it. Attend company affinity network events, seek out young professional social mixers (quick plug for Jopwell #SummerUnlocked events), reach out to college alumni at your firm, use social media resources – be a friend. More often than not, there are other students and young professionals in your same situation looking to make connections with people just like you." - Source

4. Fun

Every place comes with unique social experiences particular to their city, from the brunch day parties in Washington, D.C. to the live music scene in Austin, TX. Keep an open mind and check out social scenes that you maybe have never experienced before. - Source

Keep an open mind and an eye out for fun activity options, you will experience new social scenes you might have never thought you'd enjoy.

5. Future

Who said this was a permanent decision? Take that leap and if it doesn't work out then you can always try something new, there are hundreds of other beautiful cities waiting for you to explore. 


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

Follow us on your favorite social platform

Instagram // Twitter // Facebook // LinkedIn

The One Thing You Should Never Do During a Job Search

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In today's day and age, we use our powerful cell phones to help us with our job search. We scroll through app and website job listings and we may have even applied to a job right from the comfort of our phones. We've called and scheduled interviews, checked and sent emails to see if we have heard from any potential employers. In a nutshell, we've used a lot of features on our phone to search for our next opportunity in the the workforce -- except for maybe one: texting.

"Texting during your job search is still a grey area. Is text an acceptable job search tool? Not really, says Jackie Ducci, CEO and founder of Ducci & Associates, a talent acquisition agency in Washington, DC. “It is rarely, if ever, a good idea for a candidate to text a potential employer during the job search process,” says Ducci." - Source

Here are some reasons why you should skip sending that text — unless you’re explicitly asked to do so — and what you should do instead:

Texting is too informal

You text your friends daily in your group chat. You text your partner to bring home food. You text your kids to find out when football practice is over. Texting is generally used as a quick - and very informal - way to communicate. If you decide on your own to text an employer, “it could give the impression that the candidate is too flippant, which is not an attractive trait!” says Ducci.

It’s a missed opportunity

Texting limits your connection to your potential employers. Texts can be misinterpreted, be dry of emotions, and take away your personality, all of which can be factors in the decision making in the hiring process. 

Even if you are shy to hop on a phone call with an employer, you should take that opportunity to showcase who you are. Says Ducci: “Getting on the phone can continue to foster a deeper, more human relationship with the potential employer.” A text-only message conveys a brief bit of information, but speaking on the phone gives you the chance to let an employer hear your voice—and more importantly, what you need to say.

You don’t know how the person feels about texting

You never really know how your potential employer feels about texting. “Even if there is nothing technically wrong with sending a text, why take such an informal route when there is no upside in doing so?” says Ducci. After all, you never know how your text will be perceived, so it may be best to keep to the side of caution.

You can text an employer if …

The only clear ok to text an employer during a job search is if they set the precedent to do so. Ex: The employer texts you for specific information (e.g., confirm interview date, location, reference numbers, etc) then it's completely okay to text back. Anything more than simple information should require a professional form of communication.

 


WE’RE RECRUITING!

Welcome to ITH Staffing, a healthcare and information technology industry trusted leader.

If you are looking for a new top paying opportunity with benefits, then send in your resume to Staffing@ITHStaffing.com to be connected with a seasoned recruiter. We serve over 3,000 organizations through all 50 U.S. states.

Learn more about ITH Staffing

Check out our job board

Read more of our job advice blog

Contact us today!

Follow us on your favorite social platform

Instagram // Twitter // Facebook // LinkedIn

 

After Your First 90 Days At A New Job...What's Next?

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After Your First 90 Days At A New Job

"Congratulations! You made it past your first 90 days at your new job. Hopefully, it went smooth and now you can focus on building your tenure into something great. Even if your first 90 days was a little rocky, you can still turn it around into something positive. Your first 90 days was a time of acclimation, learning and fighting the jitters. Beyond your first 90 days there is still a lot to learn but now it’s more about performing and contributing." - The Daily MBA

 

WHAT WORKED, WHAT DIDN’T

Time to be honest with yourself, let's review your last 90 days and plan ahead for the next 90. This assessment review is to see what worked and what didn't, with a clear view of how you are meshing into the company culture and how easy it is for you to get your goals accomplished in this environment. It is important to have a good rapport with your new supervisor (which we hope you do), so it's time to sit down and go over how they perceive your performance. This review session will help you dig deeper into what areas you are fantastically performing and what areas need some more work.

"Once you understand how you did, create an action plan for the next 90 days on how you will maintain and improve. This method of evaluating your performance every 90 days is a great way to think about your tenure. Ninety day increments are long enough to get meaningful work done, yet short enough to remember what you did. Make this part of your one-on-one. Doing this will allow you to focus on what’s important and have check in points more often than your annual review." - The Daily MBA

Tip: Create a 90 day plan for yourself. Review the plan with your boss to ensure that you are working on the right tasks

 

TAKING ON MORE RESPONSIBILITY

As you grow into your new role, it's only natural that you immerse yourself more into the company and become involved. This path of taking on more responsibility can lead to senior roles if desired. Taking on new tasks and slowly taking on more can show your supervisors that are a valuable employee with growth potential. More responsibility does come tied with more accountability so make sure you are ready for the challenge when you step up.

"Tip: Perform your assigned tasks well and on schedule. This will naturally lead to more responsibly. Be self-aware as to what you can safely handle while still making your commitments." - The Daily MBA

 

BUILDING STRONGER BONDS

Everyone from the CEO to your coworkers is crucial to your success. These are the people you see and collaborate with daily, the ones you eat lunch with, and the ones you team up with to accomplish company goals. Through long hours of working and problem-solving, you will naturally build professional and personal bonds with people. These relationships and connections will ultimately determine your experience at your company, so it is important to get to know these people on a professional and personal level. Take a closer look at what they do and why they do it, take a look at how they contribute to the overall success of the company. Interacting will naturally lead to building strong bonds with your co-workers. 

In some companies, it can be difficult to build bonds with senior management since you may not interact with them on a daily basis or in the same areas. Even so, with this hurdle, it is important to have your superiors at least know who you are and what you do. 

"Tip: Be curious about what others do so that you understand how everyone fits into the company. Get to know your co-workers at a personal level."

 

BECOMING INDISPENSABLE

Success can be many things to many people. One essential way to succeed is to become the "go-to" person when a major project needs to be done and done well. Getting to this point requires you to understand thoroughly your company culture and to know the strength and weaknesses of your coworkers. Indispensable people are the ones that get pulled into discussions or projects where their expertise can be used to rapidly and effectively solve problems. Keep in mind that indispensable people are highly valued but that does not mean irreplaceable.

"Tip: Find a project or task that gives you the visibility to show that you are indispensable. Strive to always meet commitments and be the go to person for difficult tasks." - The Daily MBA

 

SETTING THE STAGE FOR PROMOTION

If you want to move on to the next level then a key part of this is to understand how your company promotes people. This can be different from boss to boss, from company to company, and even department to department.  Once you know the rules you can now have a clear line of sight to be promoted. 

One thing that many people do not talk about is the importance of mentoring someone to take your old position. You must train and mentor this person to be able to pick up where you left off so you can comfortably be able to move up to your next role. This leaves no room for excuses of who can take over your responsibilities.

"Tip: The best way to get promoted is to train your replacement." - The Daily MBA

 

THE JOURNEY NEVER ENDS

"Your tenure will be a constant revolving of these 90 day plans until you leave or run the place. Thinking in terms of 90 day increments will allow you to focus on what’s important but also allow you to show your boss the value you add at regular increments. This is vital because your yearly review is too infrequent and not a good tool to ensure that you are delivering to you and your bosses expectations. Ninety day plans are also a great way to set expectations so that you and your boss are aligned to what is important." " - The Daily MBA

Tip: Make the 90 day plan a regular part of your career building toolkit.


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